Fish fertilizer - lost directions

Yo, gardeners -
I went to use a jug of Atlas Fish Fertilizer that had been sitting around, and found the directions for application had faded beyond legibility. Am concerned about over- or under-applying
Have tried to find directions on-line, but each link just discusses types of fish fertilizers generally.
If anybody has (a) the directions -- how much per "x" type of plant -- or (b) a link to directions, your help would be appreciated.
Persephone
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Persephone wrote:

At 4-1-1 or 5-1-1, depending on when you bought it, there can't be any danger of using too much as longs as it's used in moderation, or that's the way it seems to me
More than you want to know, but here is what the mixture contains: http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4383845.html Tom J
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On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 10:11:26 -0700, Persephone wrote:

First link says Atlas is manufactured by Alaska Brand Second link is for alaska fish fert and contains application rates:
http://www.rainyside.com/resources/fishfert.html
Q: Alaska Fish Fertilizer is more expensive than this other fish fertilizer. Why?
A: There are 3 different types of fish fertilizer on the market- Natural Organic fish emulsion, amended fish emulsion, and enzymatic fish fertilizer. I've already described how natural organic fish emulsion is manufactured. Amended fish emulsion is produced the same way, but it has more than 1% synthetic materials, usually urea, added. A good example of this is Atlas Fish Fertilizer, sold only in California (and manufactured by Alaska Fish Fertilizer), or the K-Gro brand sold at K-Mart. Enzymatic fish fertilizer usually has a NPK of somewhere around 2-5-3 (vs. 5-1-1 or 5-2-2 for fish emulsions), which is a good way to tell which means of manufacturing was used. The enzymatic method has fish scraps being placed in a stainless steel vat, and enzymes are added to cause it to deteriorate. Then the remaining stickwater has the oil skimmed off, and is boiled down to a 40-50% solid solution. At this point the NPK is about 2-0.5-1.5. Then phosphoric acid is added to kill the enzymes that were added (and the pH needs to be lower than 4 for this to happen), then some potash is added to raise the pH level to about 4.5.
The amended fish emulsion is less expensive because any fish solubles can be used, which are less expensive than the higher quality ones required for Alaska Fish Fertilizer. Enzymatic fish fertilizer is very inexpensive to manufacture, has very low shipping costs (since it is usually bottled where it was manufactured), and uses chemical enhancements to raise the NPK.
http://www.planetnatural.com/site/alaska-fish-fertilizer.html
HTH Charlie
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On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 14:28:31 -0500, Charlie wrote:

Yes, I had been there; didn't find application rates, but did see interesting story you posted below.
Persephone

That's it, Charlie, bingo! Thanks.
P.
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wrote:

P.
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On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 10:11:26 -0700, Persephone wrote:

I don't measure this stuff. Shake up the bottle, pour a tablespoon or two in a 2-gallon watering can, force-fill with water. Since it is organic, no concern about too strong-weak.
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