Fertizlizing just before rain

Looks like we're in for rain every week or so in the PRC (Calif). Grass is growing like crazy, with the weather still in the 60-70's. What kind of treatment is good just before a 1-2 inch rain?
Snuffy
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writes:

Simple answer:
NONE
Whatever you apply, it will get washed away.
--
Dan Espen

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Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

I like a back rub. YMMV
--
David

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I thought about that, but was thinking the fertilizer granules would sink down under the grass. But your suggestion makes sense, so I'll hold off.
What about the next day or so, after the rain stops, but the ground is still wet?
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Great idea!
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Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

rain has a bit of fertilizer in it.
i'll agree with David on the backrub.
songbird
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On 12/15/2014 9:09 PM, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

Google sez, PRC is Peoples Republic of China but we know what you mean.
I don't fertilize if heavy rain is expected as it might wash away.
I also don't have to cut grass in winter.
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Snuffy McKinney wrote:

Scotch.
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message Looks like we're in for rain every week or so in the PRC (Calif). Grass is growing like crazy, with the weather still in the 60-70's. What kind of treatment is good just before a 1-2 inch rain?
Snuffy
if grass is growing like crazy, it doesn't need fertilizer.
Best to wait until spring and fertilize a bit when you expect a light rain.
Now, trees are a different story, since their roots are deeper. But consider your terrain and don't apply if too much rain is coming so it can be washed off rather than dissolved and percolated into the ground.
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On 12/15/2014 6:09 PM, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

In anticipation of the rain storm before last night's storm, I broadcast a generous amount of gypsum on my back lawn. The lawn is red fescue, an ornamental grass that grows about 6-12 inches and flops over. Previously, before earlier storms, I did the front lawn ("pink clover", Persicaria capitata) and the beds both in front and back. I used a total of about 225 pounds of gypsum.
Gypsum is not a nutrient. It reacts with the clay soil that is so common in southern California, causing the clay to become granular and porous. That means any further rain will soak into the soil instead of all running off. Unfortunately, the gypsum eventually leaches away; so I have to repeat the treatment about every other year.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On 12/17/2014 2:10 AM, David E. Ross wrote:

Gypsum, calcium sulfate, will lower lawn pH. Western soils tend to be alkaline and gypsum is useful to lower pH. Those in the eastern US tend to be acidic and limestone is often used to raise pH.
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