Fertilizing roses

Have to confess, fertilizing is one of my weakest areas, garden-wise.
Ex: Always afraid to fertilize roses, too soon after pruning.
Pruned late January.
ISTR wait till first buds appear? Or?
Wd appreciate input from members *with similar climates* (So. Calif Coastal).
Also your guides to best Internet sites. There's overwhelmingly much out there.
TIA
HB
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On 2/9/2015 1:26 PM, Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

My roses are already showing leaves, so I fed them yesterday. I gave them a mix of ammonium, iron, and magnesium sulfates (listed in declining amounts).
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On Monday, February 9, 2015 at 3:49:51 PM UTC-8, David E. Ross wrote:

Tx, David. How is this different from commercial rose food from nursery? I don't have one handy to compare formulae.
TIA
HB

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On 2/11/2015 8:32 AM, Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

Commercial fertilizers often contain phosphorus, which is a waste of money and a potential pollutant. The problem is that phosphorus -- which promotes flowering -- does not readily dissolve. Instead, it must be placed where roots will find it. That is why I always place either bone meal or super-phosphate in the bottom of planting holes when planting something. Also, every 5-10 years or so, I take a piece of steel rebar, poke holes about 1-2 feet deep in the root zone of my roses, and then fill the holes with super-phosphate.
Furthermore, roses prefer an acid soil. That is why I use sulfates. Most commercial fertilizers are relatively neutral.
Despite all that, I do use a commercial fertilizer. I feed my roses monthly from the time new shoots appear after pruning until late October. After the initial feeding with ammonium, iron, and magnesium sulfates, I alternate between only ammonium sulfate (nitrogen) and a commercial fertilizer that contains a systemic insecticide. The instructions for the commercial fertilizer say to use it every 6 weeks, but I only use it a full two months apart. I never see aphids, spider mites, or bark borers.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On Wednesday, February 11, 2015 at 9:36:41 AM UTC-8, David E. Ross wrote:

Most informative, tx.
Two further q's:
Why would (commercial)) phosphorus be a "potential pollutant".
Which commercial fertilizer avec insecticide do you use?
TIA
HB
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On 2/11/2015 4:29 PM, Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

Because the phosphorus disolves so slowly, it is more likely to wash away and enter streams and lakes. Eventually, it will disolve and then cause excessive algae growth. As the older algae die, their decomposition consumes more oxygen than the living algae produce, leaving insufficient oxygen for fish and other aquatic animals.

I use Bayer 2-in-1 rose and flower care. It contains Imidacloprid, which should be used sparingly since it is quite harmful to bees. Although not approved for use on edibles, studies indicate it is harmless to birds and mammals (including humans). Thus, I use an Imidacloprid drench on my peach tree to prevent flat-head bark borers; but I use it only after the tree has finished blooming. I also use Imidacloprid on my dwarf citrus to treat leaf miners, but only after I see actual leaf miner damage and not when the trees are blooming or about to bloom.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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