Fertilizers and care?

*sigh*
I'm going to post a long list of plants that I have around my home, mostly potted indoors. There are a few plants in the ground outside that I'll mark with an asterisk "*". I'm looking for information about fertilizing and general care for these plants. I don't want to make a "Tell me what to do" post, but I haven't had much luck in locating this information in some manner that I can use. Some website have some info about some plants, other sites about other plants, but none of it seems to be from the same standpoint (measurement of fertilizer, scheduling, etc.)
I'm located in Calgary, Alberta. Zone 3a I believe.
Take a look if you're so inclined and comment on anything you notice... I'm basically flying blind here, just watering when the plants need it and that's about it. I really wish I had a digital camera as some of these guys are interesting.
One problem I **REALLY** would like to solve is "fungus gnat" or "fruit flies!" I've tried using Safers BTK (has Bacillus Thuringiensis) while watering... was told that it would affect the larvae in the soil, but doesn't seem to have made a difference and some plants don't seem to like it.
* Red Fall Apple tree - ~ 6 feet tall, planted this year. Had some powdery mildew that I treated with some sulfer (and probably should hit again soon). Doesn't look happy, but it's not dying. Leaves seem dry. * Valiant Grape - also planted this year. It's supposed to be Zone 2... We'll see. * Several types of Raspberry bushes - planted a little over a year ago. Only one plant has any fruit. They look healthy though. * Goosberry - Planted last year with lots of berries. * Chokeberry - Nothing to write about. New this year. Doesn't look sad nor happy. * Blueberry - Planted this year and actually got a berry from it! * Lilac - one planted earlier this year which looks like it's just drying out. Another from last year is slowly coming along. * Climbing rose - Thought it died last winter. One of seven survived last year. Guess that's what happens when you buy cheap and plant late. * Portulaca - They LOVE the heat and sun here in Calgary. It's VERY dry. Wife is going to plant TONS of these around next year. * Strawflower - Some inside, some out. The ones inside are pretty much dead. Leaves got very droopy, as though there wasn't enough water, but watering didn't help. Leaving them dry didn't help. Moving ot the shade or sun didn't make much difference either. The one outside seems OK, but doesn't seem healthy either. - Grapefruit - Yup. Planted the seeds from a storebought grapefruit and they ALL came up. Got pots around the house, up to 12" high. For some reason they occasionaly leak sap from their stems. Actually got a flower on one now. - Hibiscus - Had two but one just didn't survive an aphid infestation. The other is healthy, but doesn't grow much, nor flower. Probably not enough light. - Spider plants - Got TONS of these. Many are spindly, but they propagate pretty easily! How do I get them to thicken up?!? - English Ivy - I love the way these reach grow out, but I wish they'd branch a bit more. Currently have a pot above the stairs with ivy almost 10 feet long! - Dracaena - Loves it's place in the office here. It's about 3' tall, but I wish I had a 7' tall version of this. - Hearleaf Philodendron - At least that's what I think it is. Was about 4 inches long in a tiny tropical pot when I got it. It is now at least 20 feet if I put it out straight. It's tangled in the banister going to my second floor as well as down into my basement. It definately needs a new hanging pot! Got another perched atop my kitchen cupboards to fill the space and it looks GREAT! - Various ferns - Jade plant - Getting to big for its own good. Needs a repot. - African violets - I transplant them and they fill the new pot! All need to be split. One is putting out "seed pods" ??? - Arrowhead plants - Taking over a number of mixed pots. - Cedar - Ya... it's indoors in a pot, only about 18" high. It loved it the first few months here in my office, but it has been getting dark and grey lately. Still has lots of new growth on it though. - Jack Pines - These are about 4" tall. They've been potted for a year now and I don't think they've grown half an inch. They're still green, but they aren't doing ANYTHING. - Aloe - I have two. One is healthy and going nuts. The other seems healthy, but the spines (leaves?) grow out sideways. It looks like it was sat upon, but it's been growing like that forever!
That's about all the plants that I can think of off the top of my head. Not really look for much from this post, but if anyone has any comments regarding my plants listed - how to fertilize, solutions for the more questionable plants, etc. - I'd appreciate seeing them.
What I love is the scent of Hyacinths, but they die much to quickly. I also love the way a strong Hybiscus flowers. The Portulaca we have look wonderful, but they're outside. The wife misses the scent of the citrus groves... Wish I could find something that would be happy inside, have lots of flowers and a nice strong scent!
...anyhow, this post is long and rambling enough!!!! : ) Thanks for reading this far!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"...haven't had much luck in locating this information..." Are you serious? Try using your trusty search engine. Try the website of any college or university with a horticulture department. Try looking in your local library.
Email me if you would like some suggestions of learning materials.
--beeky
Some One wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"J. Lane" wrote:

Blueberries are self-fertile so they will produce fruit individually, however you will get better and larger crops if they do have another cultivar with which to cross pollinate. And I would question the positioning in shade - more sun will produce more flowers, resulting in more fruit. Fertilizing in spring with a rhododendron fertilizer (or one specified for acid loving plants) will help to maintain soil acidity. Miracid (aka Miracle Gro for Acid Lovers) will do little to change or intensify soil acidity.
Your remaining berries will benefit from a good mulching with compost each spring. Roses are heavy feeders - they like lots of sun, regular applications of a rose fertilizer during the growing season (stop in mid-August) and adequate water. You might want to consider crown mulching over winter to protect from severe cold. Lilacs prefer lean soil, neutral to slightly alkaline pH (although they will do fine in slightly acidic soil as well) and don't require fertilizing.
You might want to consider looking for a good book on backyard fruit growing, specially one that is written for your climate. It will outline fruit varieties that will perform well for your location and describe the best way to care for them. Most will also provide at least the essentials on pests and problems and how to treat. Inquire from your local extension agent. And there are are many books on the care of indoor plants, as well. Look for a series of plant care books by D. G. Hessayon - the "Expert" series. They address all manner of plants (houseplants, fruits, vegetables, roses, etc) and are very thorough in their approach to growing requirements, care, fertilizing and pests and problems. All readily available through Amazon.com.
I'm not sure why you couldn't find this information on the 'net. It is most definitely there in various forms. Try doing a google search entering the plant name comma care - you will get scores of hits. The same thing can be done for pest and disease problems - i.e., 'apples, powdery mildew'. In many cases, the information will be tailored to specific locations and climates.
pam - gardengal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As far as the Portulaca's go. just keep them watered, fertilize every so often, and let them run their course. Once you have them you may alwys have them. I have them and I've never planted them.
sparkie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just wanted to say thanks to all who replied.
Just to clarify... I can find information for each kind of plant, but trying to get all the information into one coherent system takes a bit of work... "Should I plant these two plants together?" "Plant A needs X. Plant B needs Y. Is there anything that could be used for both?"... that kind of thing.
Take care!

about
a
some
it
<snip>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[...]

Let them get rootbound. I mean, so rootbound that you can hardly knock them out of their pots. They'll bloom and be happy. Feed them once in awhile with Shultz's or any normal houseplant food. (I use water-soluable houseplant fertilizers.)
Water them when they get dry. Let them dry out between waterings.
Soak them in the sink once in awhile, so you get the entire rootball wet. When they start looking unhappy, it's time to soak them until you don't see any bubbles coming up out of the soil. Then let them sit in the water for another 10 minutes.
Otherwise, ignore them and they'll love you.
Jan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.