Fertilizer ratio

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I am building my first vegetable garden. I took some soil to be tested and it was recommended that I put 8 pounds of 13-13-13 per 1000 sq ft.
My garden is only 160 square feet so I don't need very much. The Coop suggested a small bag of 6-7-7 and using twice as much (2.5 pounds). This makes sense, but thought I would check here for confirming advice.
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no point in adding fertilizer before knowing your soil PH. I wouldn't add any fertilizer to a vegetable garden its first season anyway. It sounds like wherever you went they were just trying to sell you a supply of fertilizer, probably something you really don't need. You'd do better to buy your own little soil test kit so you can check the PH, a basic kit costs under $10. You can add some granular lime to lower acidity, add peat moss to raise acidity... don't add too much or you will find yourself seesawing. For fertilizing your size garden till/spade in like a half dozen 40lb bags of composted cow manure, after the first growing season. Think about composting... you'll never need to buy any additives.
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I had the testing performed by the County extension office.
The PH level is 6.4.
Nutrient P 16 (ppm) below optimum K 26 below optimum Ca 689 Mg 56 SO4-S 12 Zn 3.9 below optimum Fe 144 Mn 214 Cu 1.0
Estimated Base Saturation
Total 62.4 Ca 51.8 Mg 7.0 K 1.0 Na 2.6
I took the soil sample made right after I turned the sod. It took three weeks to get the results and since then I have added 2.2 cubic feet of compressed peat moss and two bags of manure humus mix. I am a little concerned with the PH being more acidic since I added the peat moss, but there was a lot of dirt compared to the thin layer of peat moss.
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should plant your first crops without adding any fertilizer, that way you'll know the results, it may well be that you don't need to ever add fertilizer... if it ain't broke don't fix it.
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brooklyn1 wrote:

I totally disagree with you about not adding any fertilizer. ALL crops require a lot of food and even if your soil is very good the proper amount of fertilizer (as recommended after a soil test) is HIGHLY recommended. Yes, the OP could get by without adding any but my bet is that he would not get anywhere near the crop that he will get by using it.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

To see pictures from my garden visit http://members.iglou.com/brosen
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Just as long as everybody knows that chemical fertilizers are salts and that they kill soil (an incredibly stupid thing to do).
There is a financial incentive for lobbyists and public relation types to get you to buy chemical fertilizers and insecticides which kill ecosystems. There is no money in composting and crop rotation which grow top soil. Are you smart, stupid, or apathetic?
--

Billy
Democrat and Republican Leaders Behind Bars
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wrote:

I never add fertrilizer to my plot in a community garden and other gardeners admire my results. I only add compost, which is not legally fertilizer.
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Would you add composted cow manure the first year of a small tomato patch and maybe some squash and peppers?
Gloria
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At some point you will be obliged to add nitrogen to your soil, if you grow heavy consumers like tomatoes or corn, ect. Manure is the traditional choice, and a good one. I've been experimenting with legumes and rye. Legumes because they fix nitrogen in the soil (yes, I know that it is really bacteria), and rye because it puts so much organic material IN the soil.
Top soil is reduced by using chemical fertilizers, REGARDLESS of what Bill R. thinks (I'm giving him the benefit of the doubt here.). Chemferts work best with top soil but as the topsoil disappears, more and more chemferts must be added to maintain crop production. In the meantime, the chemferts flow with rain water into aquifers to poison the water (children are the most susceptible) or follow the water sheds to the sea where they create enormous blooms of algae that then die and decay, sucking up nearly all the oxygen from the water and create enormous dead zones. Don't tell Bill R. though. I want to surprise him ;O)
--

Billy
There are no lobbyists for cover crops and crop rotation. Why?
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Billy wrote:

And the environmental wacko comes out of the woodwork! If it was up to you people a lot of the world would starve to death.
I advise you to to do a little research and you will see who wrong you are.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

To see pictures from my garden visit http://members.iglou.com/brosen
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Perhaps of interest deals with "the Green Revolution".
<http://livingheritage.org/green-revolution.htm
Wacko Bill W
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA







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wrote:

Hey! Count me in as one of the envirowackos!!!
http://www.cnr.berkeley.edu/~christos/articles/cv_organic_farming.html http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070711134523.htm http://www.cnr.berkeley.edu/~christos/articles/cv_organic_farming.html http://news.mongabay.com/2007/0712-organic.html
the above are just a jump off point, lots of research, theory, data, opinion can be found all over the old internets.
Try a bit of research on the number of *children* that die each day from starvation and dig into *why* so many are starving. The answers may surprise you.
Thanks to *you* people, we seem to be in a bit of a bind 'round the world, doncha know?
Charlie, wacko
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Please sir, give this ignorant peasant a cite (if you can), where I can learn this wondrous news.
--

Billy
There are no lobbyists for cover crops and crop rotation. Why?
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wrote:

Hmmmmm....it's been three days, and I see no cites forthcoming from ChemicalHead Rosen. He's likely trying to get his head around the cite Mr. Bill provided and wondering what the hell Punjabis are and what they have to do with all this stuff. I hope he doesn't discover that Vandana Shiva is one of them damned furriner enviro wackos and (shudder) an ecofeminist and one of the really, really smart folks on the planet. It *should* upset his little CF worldview.
Damn, some days it's hardly worth chewing thru the straps, Billy.
Charlie
"Humanity has eaten more than 80,000 plant species through its evolution. ... we now rely on just eight crops to provide 75 percent of the world's food...Monocultures are destroying biodiversity, our health and the quality and diversity of food" -- Vandana Shiva
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The moderator wrote:

What vegetables are you plan on growing? Quite frankly I don't understand why your coop suggests 6-7-7. Also, they need to learn that using twice as much is not (usually) as good a solution as using the right fertilizer to begin with. Actually it might be better to use the amount that you were told (8 lbs per 1000 sq ft) and use the 6-7-7 (if is is readily available; that seems like a strange mix) and put it on now and then again latter in the season.
I have an established garden and each spring I use about 1 pound of 9-12-12 per two hundred square feet at least a month before I plant anything. Once the garden is off and growing on the heavy feeding crops (like tomatoes) I feed them every couple of weeks using a liquid fertilizer. I like the Expert brand (sold by Wal*Mart). It is as good as the brand names and is much cheaper (but double what it was 5 years ago).
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

To see pictures from my garden visit http://members.iglou.com/brosen
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The 13-13-13 came in pretty big bags. I only needed 1 1/2 pounds of 13-13-13 so he recommended I buy a small bag of 6-7-7.
I am growing a lot of stuff since this is my first garden. I am going to try and cram in the following.
Corn Zucchini Tomatoes Okra Peas Cantaloupe Potatoes
I bought an electronic soil tester. It was measuring my PH at about 7.3. Maybe it was too cool to get a good reading, but I thought my soil was more Alkali than the report showed.
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The moderator wrote:

Cheap probe testers (maybe yours was not cheap) are not very accurate, the dye indicator pH kits are more reliable, easier and cheaper for home use. Why did you think your soil was more alkaline?
David
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My electronic PH meter measured 7.3. The County extension office measured 6.4.
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Are there buffered soil standards ? If so get three PH 3,7 and 10 .
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA







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Why not just adjust D.I. water with NaOH or H2SO4 to pH 7 and drop in your sample?
--

Billy
There are no lobbyists for cover crops and crop rotation. Why?
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