Fertilizer for slow growing plants

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Recently we planted around 15 4" annuals around our yard. Two or three of them are not growing as well as the others. Is there some kind of fertilizer you would recommend that we can feed them to help their growth? We live in Western Washington state. Thanks.
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tenplay said:

I like Osmocote (or a similar product) for annual bedding plants.
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Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
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Osmocote (or the generic equivilent) works very well before you plant them, after planting, Miracle Grow works very well, my only complaint with that is that you have to reapply about every other week, because its basically a liquid fertilizer.
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Hmmm...that seems VERY frequent.
The "purists" (not meant derogatorily) hold that Miracle Gro works on the *plants*, whereas "organic" fertilizers work on the *soil*. Idea being that when the soil is healthy, plants will do better than when they get an instant shot of fertilizer like Miracle Gro.
Not taking a position either way, as I'd have to grow stuff in two identical plots to have a control, required to verify the opposing (or complementary?) procedures scientifically.
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Absolutely, its very fequent. Miracle grow is a foliar feeder, and doesn't last long in the soil at all. There is no substitute for good healthy soil, its absolutely essential.
however that said, my gathering of the meaning of the post is that all they were looking for was a quick solution. Compost tea and some plant tone would most likely be a better long term solution.
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me wrote:

Compost tea is hogwash. Just plain old compost would be much better.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
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On Thu, 07 Jul 2005 21:21:41 GMT, "Travis"
So Travis another one of your silly one liners....
You and Paggers are welcome to your silly opinions, bsed on no experience....
For those with open minds...
Part I:
The following is a selection of recent science papers and on-farm test results on compost teas, composts, soil microbial diversity, biorationals, and disease-suppressive composts posted to the Compost Tea List on Yahoo!Groups.
Date: Fri Sep 17, 2004 12:59 pm Subject: Compost: A review of the composting process, biocontrol mechanisms, & suppression of turfgrass disease http://www.springerlink.com/app/home/contribution.asp?wasp efee145f47472297fb979ddf63e5c1&referrer=parent&backto=issue,1,16;journal,45,63;linkingpublicationresults,1:100229,1 Date: Tue Oct 19, 2004 8:36 pm Subject: Phytopathology journal article on compost tea, November 2004 http://groups.yahoo.com/group/compost_tea/message/10013
Date: Tue Oct 19, 2004 8:42 pm Subject: Plant Disease journal article on compost teas, August 2003 http://groups.yahoo.com/group/compost_tea/message/10014
Date: Wed Oct 20, 2004 12:06 pm Subject: Phytopathology88:compost water extracts+induced resistance by Zhang & Hoitink http://groups.yahoo.com/group/compost_tea/message/10024
Date: Tue Oct 26, 2004 9:24 pm Subject: Soil microbial diversity in German-English journal http://groups.yahoo.com/group/compost_tea/message/10130
Date: Thu Jan 6, 2005 12:56 pm Subject: Tomato foliar disease control using OMRI-approved materials http://groups.yahoo.com/group/compost_tea/message/11127
Date: Wed Jan 12, 2005 10:34 pm Subject: A new literature review on compost teas for disease suppression http://groups.yahoo.com/group/compost_tea/message/11231
Part II:
The following excerpts are from the compost tea resource list I use to supplement my workshops and publications in my ATTRA work:
2.0 Literature Reviews
a.
Scheuerell, Steve, and Walter Mahaffee. 2002. Compost tea: Principles and prospects for plant disease control (Literature review). Compost Science & Utilization. Vol. 10, No. 4. (Autumn) p. 313 - 338.
This is the literature review published in Compost Science & Utilization by Steve Scheuerell and Walter Mahaffee of Oregon State University. It was part of Scheuerell's PhD disseration on compost teas. This is the most thorough and extensive literature review on compost teas published to date.
Compost Science & Utilization is a journal published by JG Press, Inc., which also publishes BioCycle, the trade magazine of the composting industry.
Archived articles in JG Press publications are available online for 3 each.
The JG Press, Inc. Archives http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/jgpress /
Compost Science & Utilization. Vol. 10, No. 4. (Autumn) http://www.jgpress.com/CSUContents/2002/Autumn2002.html
b.
Organic Teas from Composts and Manures Richard Merrill, OFRF Grant Report 9740 www.ofrf.org/publications/Grant%20reports/97.40.10 .Merrill.Fall97.IB9.pdf
An Organic Farming Research Foundation report. This is the full OFRF report; a 51-page PDF download, with 88 literature references in the bibliography, "Selected References for Organic Tea Extract Studies."
This OFRF research report is based on work at Cabrillo Community College.
It has noteworthy background information on compost teas and the composting process. It provides an interesting explanation of the Four Paths of Organic Decay.
Of special interest, is the prototype homemade aerobic compost tea extractor, based on a double barrel design.
c.
Litterick, A.M., L. Harrier, P. Wallace, C. A. Watson, M. Wood. 2004. The Role of Uncomposted Materials, Composts, Manures, and Compost Extracts in Reducing Pest and Disease Incidence and Severity in Sustainable Temperate Agricultural and Horticultural Crop Production A Review. Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences. Volume 23, Number 6 (November-December). p. 453 - 479.
This is a new (November-December 2004) literature review published in Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences by a research group in Scotland and England. The Taylor & Francis Group, publisher of Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, provides access to the abstract for free on its Web site. Talk to your local librarian for assistance in obtaining the full 27-page literature review in PDF.
Abstract in Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences 1. http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=u1l4cyddht5kbej9
2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07352680490886815
6.0 On-Farm Research into Compost Teas
a.
Evaluating the Benefits of CompostTeas to the Small Market Grower Minnesota Greenbook 2003 www.mda.state.mn.us/esap/greenbook2003/fruitsveg1.pdf
Evaluating the Benefits of CompostTeas to the Small Market Grower Minnesota Greenbook 2002 www.mda.state.mn.us/esap/greenbook2002/fv3bailey.pdf
Evaluating the Benefits of CompostTeas to the Small Market Grower Minnesota Greenbook 2001 www.mda.state.mn.us/esap/greenbook2001/2001gb30.pdf
These PDF papers are 4-6 pages each. They summarize on-farm research into compost teas, funded by the Energy and Sustainable Agriculture Program at the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. They provide insight into compost tea preparation, microbial analysis, and compost tea use on the farm, with a summary of results.
b.
Compost Tea Brewer Test Results North Country Organics www.norganics.com/tests.html www.norganics.com/Test7-17.pdf
Paul Sachs at North Country Organics, author of Edaphos: Dynamics of a Natural Soil System and Handbook of Successful Ecological Lawn Care, conducted a series of compost tea brewing trials. This Web site hosts the SFI microbial analysis reports from these trials. The parameters for each batch of compost tea are noted with each lab report. The parameters included volume of tea, brewing time, aeration time, water temperature, and the use of three compost tea additives known as Fungal Booster, Bacterial Booster, and Mineral Booster.
c.
EPM Compost Tea Test Results from SFI www.composttea.com/test_results.htm
Bruce Elliott at EPM, Inc. in Cottage Grove, Oregon, manufactures the Earth Tea Brewer. This Web site hosts SFI microbial analysis reports for compost teas brewed with EPM's 22-, 100-, and 500-gallon Earth Tea Brewers.
Part III:
Also see:
1.
Compost Teas: Microbial Hygiene and Quality in Relation to Method of Preparation W. Brinton, P. Storms, et al Biodymamics | Summer 2004 | Vol. 2: 36-45. http://www.woodsend.org/pdf-files/compost-tea-BD04R.pdf
2.
Ted Peterson at EW/SOE can provide reports from completed projects submitted to municipalities as a part of its research and demonstration on the benefits and uses of composts and compost teas. Topical reports are available on:
* Wastewater industry/Biosolids composting * Park turf water conservation/Park management without chemicals * Compost tea/Micorrhiza turf tests
Contact:
Earth-Wise/Spirit of the Earth http://www.earth-wise.com
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
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Tom Jaszewski wrote:

Just post the peer reviewed publications not all those yahoo group citations.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
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On Fri, 08 Jul 2005 01:32:02 GMT, "Travis"

Travis,
I'm really not much intersted in convincing you of anything. Those links lead to data. If you're not willing to use the yahoo group links to the studies I could give a shit...
Fact is compost tea is a fantastic soil development tool. Lots of real world sustainable growers and farmers are using CT with great success. If those of us who garden and farm for a living waited for peer review we would have long ago lost our jobs and farms.
Save your one liners for the amateurs....
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wrote:

You don't deal with facts. You deal with vendor folklore, sales pitches which you may or may not personally believe but which originate from flimflam artists, & range from totally untrue assertions to exaggerations of smaller truths. In their elaborated forms promulgated by vendors of compost tea products, there is at most one "fact" for ever fifty false claims, & that one fact is misrepresented in a context that renders it no longer factual.
A "fact" would be something like Travis's "Just plain old compost would be much better." Even a best-case exaggerated scenario for compost tea should be willing to acknowledge THAT as a fact.
The request for peer-reviewed science is not one that would piss off vendors off so much if the science supported the claims. Vendors are wildly enamored of "findings" in non-peer-reviewed & irreproducible studies. The better the science, the more the vendors assert that science isn't required.

Precisely as watering is a fantastic soil development "tool." Watering the garden has the exact same influence on microorganism populations as does C.T. -- not more, not less. When vendors are confronted with this fact, they add additional alleged values, like the C.T. helps control diseases. But as Horticulturist Dr Chalker-Scott of the University of Washington, "In the peer-reviewed literature...field-tested compost tea reported no difference in disease control between compost tea & water." The two major claims for C.T.'s "soil development" tend to be lowering of pathogens maximizing of healthful microorganisms, but insofar as those mayh be "facts" they are not factuallyh improvements over regular watering, & any time spent manufacturing tea, & any money wasted on the expensive products associated with making the tea, is time & money wasted since just keeping things watered has the exact same value for maximizing microorganisms & minimizing pathogens.
The only thing C.T. has that plain water does not have are a few tepid nutrients beneficial sure but vastly inferior to actual compost, indeed inferior to every other known method of sustaining nutrients in the garden.

And there you go asserting that science isn't required. What you imagine here is an utter falsehood. Those who make a living farming keep abreast of the scientific data in order to improve their methods. Only in the world of charlatanry are wild claims made for products that have little to no proven added value. The correct question is does it have ADDED value. C.T. has no added value. That isn't to say it does nothing whatsoever, but it does nothing worth expending time & money to achieve since as a fertilizer it is inferior to every other method & for soil maintenance it is only equal to watering.

Save your "professional" flimflam for the marks. As I said before:
I still remember when Magic Light Box Glasses were being sold all over the city. If you put the light box on your head & adjusted the flashing lights for specific colors, you could cure any disease, restore perfect vision, & become increasingly intelligent. But of course that New Age tinfoil hat style flimflam didn't simultaneously benefit a facilitating industry, the way the Compost Tea fad is facilitated by nurseries. This one I'm afraid will be ripping people off for a long time to come.
-paggers
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There is never any point in a discussion with you when you've dug yourself in.
Consider reading the introductory page of the last "Compost Science and Utilization.
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Tom Jaszewski wrote:

Where exactly are the peer reviewed articles?
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
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On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 17:54:36 GMT, "Travis"

Interesting bunch here...peer review is valid unless we're discussing Monsanto and round up.....
Join Paggers in remaining clueless...or read...
http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/PDF/compost-tea-notes.pdf
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Tom Jaszewski wrote:

I use insecticides on ornamentals that is inside the plant not on the surface. I try not to eat glysophate.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
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On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 19:29:45 GMT, "Travis"
Indicative of your displayed garden talents...
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Tom Jaszewski wrote:

To kill the aphids.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 00:17:31 GMT, "Travis"

which also kills the ladybeetles, or at the very best, kills their food so they don't have the opportunity to kill the aphids in natural selection.
victoria
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 00:17:31 GMT, "Travis"
LOL insecticides for aphids? You're kidding, right?
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Tom Jaszewski wrote:

Bayer Rose and Flower Care. Feeds and protects against insects in one easy step. Aphids are one of the insects it kills.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
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Disulfoton is in that. Bad stuff. Even for non-organic gardeners, aphids are so easily gotten rid of it is not a great idea to use something extremely toxic to control a problem that a couple drops of dishwashing soap in water would do just as easily. Disulfoton is killing lots of benificial insects, for a net loss to the garden rather than a net gain. It contaminates water, injures fish & birds & mammals, is a carcinogen. I imagine the label warns not to use it anywhere near anything harvested to eat, & one reason to have roses is the rosehips are very useful in the kitchen. Are you convinced the roses would go all to hell if you didn't use such a product?
-paghat the ratgirl
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