Favorite daylilly sources?

Page 1 of 2  
I need to find a daylilly called "Hyperion" for next season. Variety aside, can anyone recommend a source or two for daylillies? Someone you've found to be dependable?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.bloomingfieldsfarm.com/hype.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15 Nov 2004 17:14:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (IntarsiaCo) wrote:

Jimminy! A company that just sells Daylillies and nothing else? I can't believe it. Is there THAT big a market for them>?
Em Be careful what you wish for....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/25/04 3:33 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

There are 100's of them around the world!
Cheryl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(IntarsiaCo) wrote:

Haven't you ever pulled off a country road to buy corn from someone who apparently grows and sells just corn? :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have a look at http://www.beachwooddaylily.com /
Being in Canada, it is probably too much hassle to order from them if you are in the States, but the picture gallery and infomation may be useful. Great people, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.bloomingfieldsfarm.com/hype.html

It's a big country.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/15/04 11:02 AM, in article xq4md.3852$ snipped-for-privacy@news02.roc.ny, "Doug

I'd head to Oakes or Olallie for Hyperion.
Cheryl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sam Hill Gardens in Malcolm, NE carries Hyperion
http://www.samhillgardens.com /
They start taking orders in April. I've purchased both bare root divisions and potted plants from them and have never been disappointed.
Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

aside,
to
Have you tried a Google search? 'Hyperion' is a classic and should be available through most mail order vendors, of which there are dozens that specialize in daylilies. B&D Lilies, Oakes Daylilies, Daylily Paradise, etc. Do a check with the Plants by Mail FAQ to confirm dependability and customer service. FWIW, 'Hyperion' is common enough that it should be available in local garden centers and nurseries in season, as well.
pam - gardengal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

found
I'm having no trouble finding that variety. But, after reading a few horror stories here about certain dealers shipping mislabeled plants, I'm looking for recommendations on specific companies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Buying local is better than mail order, you can get bigger roots with more buds. I think tissue cultured daylilies are just a bad as mislabeled, so check if the growers sell those.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I always try to do that. It's getting harder, though, unless one wants to drive all over the county. Why? Because even some of the best nurseries have been afflicted with teenage retail syndrome: The counter help has no initiative, no common sense, and no manners. So, calling on the phone means being put on hold and forgotten. Used to be you could call these places and get an adult who, if busy, would take your name & number and call you back about whatever you were looking for, but no more.
OK...I'm done bitching.

horror
looking
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My apologies, I remember the TR syndrome thread. :)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think it's the fault of Wal Mart, at least locally, for creating a culture where price is more important than service. Here, it's impossible to get through a cashier's line in less than 20 minutes - even the express lines, because the bobble-head teenage cashiers are busy yacking between each other.

to
have
means
and
back
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Kanter wrote:

Wal-Mart took advantage of the cultural shift, but they didn't create it. They were just a regional chain not much different from other regional discounters, and their national big-buddy, K-Mart, when the value of service left our economy.
Mostly it has to do with choice. As urban areas became a center of despair surrounded by a ring of suburban sprawl, people became more mobile. They had to. Even if they had been interested in waiting for the bus, the distances to be traveled required prompter service than mass transportation could provide. Thus the car became a dominant part of our lives, along with the ability to easily hunt down the lowest price.
If anything, the supermarkets are to blame. Every week they were sending ads to everyone's home touting that you could buy a can of beans for a cent less than the other store. And the other store was bragging that their cans of corn were a cent less expensive.
Today we're seeing a resurgence of the specialty departments (bakery, meat, produce, for example) after three decades of seeing those departments becoming less and less about personal service. Competing on price required it, and nowhere else in our society was it happening more than in the grocery business.
Discount big-boxes grew from two influences: The old "dime store" (or the 5 and 10 for those around before inflation saw the 5 disappear), and as a market for overstock from the large department stores. Wal-Mart came from the dime store side of the family, while Target came from the department store side of the family. But coming from the department store side of the family didn't automatically make a store more upscale. J.C. Penneys had a chain named Treasure Island in the Midwest, and it was one of the junkyiest places I ever saw. Wal-Mart is upscale compared to them.
Technology has had it's part in the culture of low prices, too. And not just in it's implementation by those in the distribution channels. The people who hunt for the best price online today are not of the same ilk as those who shopped by mail order catalog a couple generations ago.
At one time low price also meant low quality. Wal-Mart still has a lot of junk, including items specifically built cheap to keep the price down. But Costco has some pretty high quality items at a low price. You're going to find less service at Costco than at Wal-Mart, though.
Wal-Mart has become the new Microsoft. Their the company that it's fashionable to blame everything on. But what they're guilty of is taking the best advantage of a situation. Sam Walton and Bill Gates get painted as satin personified, but they are really just examples of the American Dream taken to the max. They didn't create the situations they took advantage of. They just had the vision to see the situation that existed, and found a way to take advantage of it.
Wal-Mart didn't create the desire for low prices, and lousy service. They just took advantage of what we already wanted to do. They didn't turn us into addicts. They just continue to supply us.
BTW... It's also fashionable to cry "buy local". But how many of us owe our income to our employer's ability to do business beyond the local boundaries? If we all bought local, we'd have fewer choices, and many (more) of us would be unemployed.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Regardless of what the Sunday circulars may lead you to believe, marketing on price is something the grocery business left behind about 5 years ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Kanter wrote:

The key word was "was".
You blamed the origin on Wal-Mart, but Wal-Mart came well after the "was" timeframe referred to. And the grocery business left it behind a little longer than 5 years ago, but only after a few decades of building their empires on it.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think WM's success is based on something else, but I don't think about it often because it's frightening to think that of all the reasons people do a certain thing, stupidity may be at the top of the list.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(big old snip)

compared

(another big old snip)
Is this the same as the Treasure City stores that were in Lincoln, Nebraska? I remember riding with Mom up there as a kid in the 70s, we always shopped at the south store (highway 2 and 27th street) and ate at the Burger Chef (before the chain got absorbed by Hardee's - isn't this another blast from the past). Then crossing highway 2 and it was all farmland south of there (now its all subdivisions for 5-6 miles... sigh). I remember the stores were pretty junky, but coming from a little town an hour's drive away, it was as close to an adventure as we got. That store is a Shopko now, and the north store on 48th (mom never went there, it meant she had to drive through Lincoln to get there, and she hated driving in larger town) had a 'new to you' clothing and household goods store last I saw.
Richard
http://www.samhillgardens.com - daylily source in the midwest (to keep this on topic)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.