Fast growing Maples.

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My husband and I recently moved to Pa and our front yard is quite expansive. Owning an acre of property, the back yard is filled with trees. In that our front yard is bare of any trees we like the Red Maples. But then coming from New England the burning yellow is also quite nice.
My question is are there other trees beside Maples that will grow faster? We have a man who mows and cares for our lawn. He would purchase and plant the trees in the fall. Thanks. Bette
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Bette wrote:

In general, the faster the growth, the more likely you will have breakge from wind. Bradford pears ar notorious around here for that. However, I must say my Chinese (Lacebark) Elm is considered a 'medium' growing tree but is growing faster than I expected. I like it. Few pest issues, small leaves, dappled shade, interesting bark. check 'em out
Carl
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Carl 1 Lucky Texan wrote:

Thank you for your info and for taking the time in doing so. : ) Bette
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I had a Chinese Elm in my back yard years ago that was about 40 ft tall and you could spend your life just picking up sticks under it.
From Mel & Donnie in Bluebird Valley
http://community.webtv.net/MelKelly/TheKids
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Mel M Kelly wrote:

Again thanks for your input. My husband and I like the maple trees and have most of the summer to choose the ones we want. Bette
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I was out walking the neighborhood and looking at trees today. I found an absolutely amazing Silver Maple a few blocks from my home.
Anyone, know the good, the bad, and the ugly about Silver Maples???
Myrl Jeffcoat http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
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Myrl Jeffcoat wrote:

Correct me if I am wrong, but the Silver Maples have a surface root problems. OR - my lawn was not fed enough grass. Thanks Myrl. Bette
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Carl- Do you know if that Laceback Elm is also resistant to Misteltoe? I need to make a tree selection before too long. I have a old Modesto Ash that is riddled with it, and will require replacement.
Myrl Jeffcoat http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
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Myrl Jeffcoat wrote:

I have no idea! What a great question.
a quick 'googling' indicates Chinese Pistache (nice tree, a friend has one and likes it) might work and be m'toe resistant. Or you might find a taller variety of Crepe Myrtle and train for a tree-like form.
maybe someone knows of a list of relative reisitance to parasites of various landscape trees.
Carl
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I'd say we are in search of the "ultimate" perfect tree. . .One that is beautiful, one that is the right size, one that isn't too messy, and especially one that is disease and parasite resistant;-)
My ole Modesto Ash trees are way beyond their expected life in years. The cost of having the Misteltoe taken out of them near annually, is an expense I hope to shy away from in future years when they become replaced.
Myrl Jeffcoat http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
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Myrl Jeffcoat wrote:

A very nice maple is Trident Maple, Acer buergeranum Silver maple is a very weak tree and here in the North Valley is very disease prone. I don't recommend it.
Look here for trident maple and other trees
http://selectree.cagr.calpoly.edu
Emilie NorCal
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mleblanca wrote:

Again thanks for your help. We had dinner with our son and his family last night and he wondered why we didn't like the Oak Tree, seeing we had them at our other house. The leaves take FOREVER to fall and all those acorns. Bette
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Try a Pin Oak (don't know the Latin). It is a member of the oak family, which
    a) doesn't have acorns (or ones that grow and fall)     b) The leaves don't fall until the spring time.
I've got one, my folks had one growing up. No mess at all, but a slow grower. Still a nice tree.
-- If I had something to say, this is where I'd say it.
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John Hines wrote:
Try a Pin Oak (don't know the Latin). It is a member of the oak family,

If the leaves fall in the spring time ~ where is the shade for the summer months? Perhaps I missunderstood. Thanks for your time in sharing this interesting tree. Bette
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Many oaks hold their leaves over the winter (brown) until the new leaves start to emerge in the spring. It's actually a PITA here, because you end up having to rake them in the spring, rather than doing all the leaf raking in the fall. I like oak leaves, however, for compost, and well-chopped for mulch.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Ann wrote:

Now that makes sense. Thanks Years ago my father taught me how to hold a rifle, stand, breath and fire. It was a .22 Rimfire rifle and I shot my first deer. Not only did I have to learn how to hunt but also field dress the animal - or skinning. I was fifteen and it was great. For the past several years I have enjoyed hunting deer with my son and his buddies in Pa. Combining the sport of horseback riding and hunting was a blast. I used acorns to lure or track deer. That was the only time an acorn found favour in my life.
Then we went to Maine to hunt Black Bear. Again the guys were responsible for transporting horses as we made our way through a dense forest. But, it was the Greenhead flies that drove us and the horses nuts. Never did see a bear that day, so we ended up just riding for the day. Bette
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Emilie- Thanks for the warning on Silver Maple. . .I have the feeling you've stopped me from a world of hurt. I'll take a look at Trident Maples instead.
Myrl Jeffcoat http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
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Myrl Jeffcoat wrote:

In that I have not googled it, my husband recalls our first house had poor landscaping. We were renting at the time and could not take it upon ourselves to add top soil and seed. So I would ask others before you gave up on the Silver Maple.
Thanks again for your response. Bette
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My favorite fast growning tree (3' a year) is Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn Redwood). It is a deciduous conifer. Frequently planted as a specimen tree, but looks good grouped as well. _________________ John Henry Wheeler Washington, DC USDA Zone 7

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John Wheeler wrote:

Thank you all for your help. Bette
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