Extreme newbie needs tools recommendations

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I am looking for recommendations for best value in gardening tools, above Home Depot level but not the absolutely best and priciest. I already have a good shovel and watering arrangement, but need the following -
Pruner: At Amazon I shortlisted Coronas. Also found a Bahco for $12 plus shipping.
Folding Hand saw, 5"-7": Felco, Corona, Fiskar, ARS?
Trowel:
Cultivator:
I don't have a short-list in these categories but am awars of brands like Radius, Fiskar, Corona, Ames, etc.
Thanks for all help.
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wrote:

Nothing wrong with starting out with tools that you will have to replace latter. I favor Japanese hand tools for esthetics and comfort. Mine have square wooden heads not round (boasting).
That said < http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/index.aspx > has many options I went with the gone Smith& Hawkins that carried Bulldog tools. As you can see it is a jungle out here.
Sometimes if lucky in a public garden or nursery you can find some codgers that love speaking and sharing gardening lore without commercial interests just know by experience and for some reason ant to share it.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
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I was going to mention Lee Valley also. If something is priced quite cheap - they will state "good value for the money" - but they wouldn't sell you a useless piece of junk - by saying that. I love getting their catalogs - artwork photos on the cover - & interesting things inside. ... which reminds me - I haven't got a catalog lately - time to place an order ! ps : some of their high-end stuff is quite pricey - hand it down to your grandkids ... John T.
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I think it's cruel to tease people by mentioning tools they cannot buy any more, like Smith & Hawken. But it's a fun kinda cruelty. :-)
WTF happened to that company anyway? Did the entire executive staff start mainlining heroin or something? One day, they have actual tools and the next, they'll selling useless decorative crap.
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<http://articles.sfgate.com/2009-07-10/news/17216571_1_smith-hawken-scott s-miracle-gro-hawken-garden>
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
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I've always found Fiskar pruning shears work more smoothly than any other brand. Definitely worth the money.
This tool won't make sense until you own one: http://www.cleanairgardening.com/horihoriknife.html
It's absolutely the single most useful garden tool I've ever owned. Mine's 25 years old. Great for digging, weeding, and the serrated edge can cut through thick roots underground. I've never sharpened mine. There's no need to. It's the shape of the thing that makes it so functional.
That's not the only source for these knives. Search on eBay using some or all of the words "japanese hori hori weeder knife" and you may find it a little cheaper.
Incidentally, from a distance, the knife looks ominous when held in the hand. I believe it may have been a handy visual aid when I needed to educate moron dog owners who didn't understand the words "not here, please". A pitch fork is better for this purpose, but you can't carry one on your belt.
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On 8/11/10 12:42 PM, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Instead of spending $34 plus shipping, I use a plain paring knife that I bought at the local supermarket for less than $10. Before buying it, I checked (1) that the blade is quite stiff and (2) that the tang of the blade extends the length of the handle. This serves quite well for weeding and edging the lawn. I do sharpen it with a whetstone when I use it for making cuttings of perennials and shrubs.
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David E. Ross
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How long is the blade of that paring knife?
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On 8/11/10 2:25 PM, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

4-1/2 inches
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David E. Ross
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In that case, you're comparing apples with space shuttles. Stop being silly.
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http://www.leevalley.com/Default.aspx
http://www2.fiskars.com/Products/Yard-and-Garden
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On 8/11/10 5:04 PM, in article rqSdnQYqGurBjf7RnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@iswest.net,

And speaking of "on the cheap", I go to the local dollar store and get steak knives. Look for the full tang, a fairly stiff blade and deep serrations. Divides over grown clumps, cuts roots and patches of lawn. Also handy for slug and hornworm killing!
Cheryl
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I just ordered a Roth hori hori in stainless steel. Looks like a great multi purpose tool for any home gardener to have around. Also looks very well made and should last many years. It's nice to have one tool that can do many tasks and do them well. Sure saves a lot of trips to the shed :) Thank you so much for bringing this tool to my attention as I have never heard of it before.
Rich
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The only problem I can foresee with stainless steel is that it'll be TOO attractive to creatures who love shiny things and never put tools back where they belong.
Hide it from your wife, in other words.
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"EVP MAN" wrote:

You wouldn't need to make a lot of trips to the shed if you kept all your small tools in a 5 gallon contractor's bucket... with the lid on it even doubles as a sturdy gardening seat.... also a good tote for tossing all those stones and weeds you never come back for.
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I use a mounted large rural mailbox.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 10:55:23 -0400, Bill who putters

I have that too, it's handy inside a veggie garden but it's not mobile, it's more like a mini tool shed. When I know I'll be walking about from area to area I gather up what tools I think I may need and grab a bucket... it's better to tote a few extra tools I'll not use than to walk all the way back for one item. Any lightweight plastic tool box works but I've found the contractor's bucket works best; they're cheap (usually free), strong, and plenty large enough for all sorts of toting, even soil or water. And one of its best uses is when you're out working up a sweat and you just need to sit under a tree for a few minutes.
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On 8/11/10 10:48 AM, RPS wrote:

See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/tools.html . My page does not recommend brands or sources, but it does describe what characteristics you might want in some tools.
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David E. Ross
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RPS wrote:

Re trowel and cultivator I have some that are cast aluminium all through with a polymer grip. They are very solid, polished and comfortable. These will not break with sensible use and above all will not rust. They were cheap about AU$6 each. I have given up on the pressed mild steel with a coat of paint type that bend and rust. With something like this brand is not important as you can see what you are getting. I may have to replace the grip in some years time - nothing is perfect.
David
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If you want a good hoe, here it is http://www.prohoe.com /
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