Experiences with Ipomoea ?

Several people suggested to my last post about plant recommendations to try Ipomoea ( Mornig Glory). I am dealing with the pests in the back yard and I dont want to introduce them to the front and regret it. So, whats your experience with Ipomoea?? What kind are least invasive? What kind are most? ANy and all input would be great!
MICK!
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(Mick709) wrote:

My experience in zone 8, planting the seeds in a sunny location, is they do poor to mediocre, & do not come back a second year. But then I put them in a semi-low-maintenance location -- they might've been fine annuals in a moister spot.
-paghat the ratgirl
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"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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I don't believe we get enough summer heat to successfully grow Ipomoea in the PNW. I have had success with Spanish Flag (Ipomoea or Mina lobata) grown in container from starts, but seeds just don't do well. Even a start of I. coccinea in full sun fizzled out.
These are all annual vines in most of the country and relatively easy to start from seed in climates with hot summers. As annuals they should not pose ANY invasive threat and in a large portion of the country, even the seeds will not ripen sufficiently to be a problem. Just stay away from the bindweed ( I doubt you will find this available for sale, anyway.) The tricolor cultivars are probably the most popular - 'Royal Ensign', 'Heavenly Blue', 'Pearly Gates', 'Flying Saucers', etc.
Water spinach, Ipomoea aquatica, IS an invasive but I doubt that is the type of morning glory you are looking for.
This link may help: http://members.aol.com/sighburtek/mgs.html
pam - gardengal
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Pam, have you tried "early call"? I grew it this summer in Spokane. It is true that it didn't start to bloom until late August, but we didn't have killing frost until late October this year, so I was able to have flowers for that long anyway. In theory, it is supposed to be the quickest variety of morning glories to come into flower, although not the most spectacular, and thus recommended for short and/or cool summer climates. I agree with you that the annual varieties of morning glory would never be invasive in cold northern climates. I do remember in north Florida that the little square orange-flowered morning glory was, shall we say, rather generous in its self-sowing habits. And there is also a purple-flowered perennial morning glory there that has a bad reputation for taking over large swaths of ground.

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Yeah, that's probably I. purpurea, maybe not the most well berhaved, but it is also a perennial form, too. Is 'Early Call' a tricolor? I'm not sure why I am asking, as I have too many other perennial vines to worry about growing the annuals :-))
pam - gardengal

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I believe "early call" is made up from selections from I. tricolor chosen for early blooming habits. My packet was supposed to be mixed colors, but all that germinated and bloomed from my packet were in the very pale purple to sky blue range. I might try them again against a hot sunny wall in the ground . I grew them in a pot, thinking that that would warm up quicker, but I think the inevitable drying out between waterings during our long hot summer also set them back. I have noticed that moonflowers grow well in Portland. (Perhaps too well). Do they also succeed in Seattle, where the other Ipomeas do not do as well?

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