Experience with Cockadoodle DOO Organic Weed Control?


Has anyone had any experience with Cockadoodle DOO Organic Weed Control.
Cockadoodle DOO Organic Weed Control http://www.purebarnyard.com/cockadoodledoo/products.asp
We live in Masachusetts and are considering trying it on our lawns this April. Clover has been our biggest problem, but we seem to have a touch of everything. Also, any alternative suggestions would be great.
Thanks, rw
____________________________________ rw - http://www.addieryan.com /
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Is that stuff supposed to make your weed wacker bigger and last longer?

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On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 03:30:24 -0800, rw wrote:

Good day Ryan, I have not personally used the above product (could they of gotten a better name..?), but I am familiar with the use of corn gluten meal as a pre-emergent. The short answer is yes.... it does work. The long answer is it may not be the cheapest route to go though. As far as I can tell, these organic weed control companies are marking up a rather cheap product ( corn gluten meal ) and selling it at a very inflated price. The meal they sell is 'pearled' unlike what you can get at a food/bakery supply store, but they are both the same.
Application rates will be much higher than one would expect for satisfactory results. The Cockadoodle DOO company (O' how it pains me to type that name!!) recommends 100 pounds per 5000 square feet. That's a lot of corn meal. Even at .50 cents a pound that's still 50 dollars per application and your lawn will have a yellow look to it for a few weeks.
Don't get me wrong, I'm really not trying to talk you out of the corn meal. I've read many positive data sheets on the use of corn meal. You can rest assured that your not killing the planet and the corn meal does offer a small fertilization at the same time. My mother-in-law is a baker and she used plain old corn meal gluten in a few flower beds with good results.
Clover is a sign post in your lawn. It's telling you that you may have : compacted soil low soil fertility (low nitrogen) too low of a mowing height
Your first step is to remove the clover. You can do this in a variety of ways. How you do it is really up to you. Chemical or mechanical, the choice is yours. After the clover is gone, improve the soil with aeration and fertilization. As far as your mowing height goes, try to keep the lawn areas mowed at 3" high. This will inhibit weed seed germination and help keep new weeds from taking root. Good luck and good day.
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Small fertilization?????? Corn gluten is between 9 and 11 prcent nitrogen! It takes 50 to 100 pounds of corn gluten per 1,000 (not 5,000) square feet to obtain any effective weed control. That means you get 4.5 to 11 pounds of nitrogen on your lawn in one application! Not good at all! The average home lawn of fescue, bluegrass or ryegrass requires only 2 to 4 lbs. of nitrogen in an entire year, and most of that should be applied in the fall. Even if applied to bermuda or zoysia, it's still extremely excessive. Can you say "nitrogen leaching, runoff and pollution"?
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Nitrogen leaching, runoff and pollution........
......and a cockadoodie to you too, Mister Man!!!!!

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On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 13:55:43 -0500, Lauren wrote:

Your numbers are just wrong. The 100 pounds per 5000 square comes from (O' gawd that name!!) Cockadoodle DOO's info page. They sell it... I would take their word for it. There are other fact sheets that suggest the application of 20 pounds per 1000.... which comes out to (hold on to your shorts now) 100 pounds per 5000 square feet.
http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/h531cornglutenmeal.html
At 10% Nitrogen, that's 2 pounds of pure N per 1000 square feet. With 2 applications per year that would be 4 pounds of N per 1000 square feet per year or the recommended ammount.
My statement about a small amount of fertilization was a mis-statement. For some reason I had 2.5%to 5% N stuck in my head. Had mixed up corn meal with alfalfa meal I'm sure. Either way, my recommended application is right and it will not cause nitrogen leaching, runoff and or pollution.
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If they are selling it, I sure wouldn't take their word for it. If, in fact, it is corn gluten, 20 lbs. per 1,000 won't control very many weeds. But don't take my word for it, try it yourself.
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On Wed, 25 Jan 2006 16:38:35 -0500, Lauren wrote:

Yes it is corn gluten, the site says so and I'm sure the bag does also. Corn gluten _does_not_ control weeds. It controls seed germination or rather suppresses seed germination. A pre-emergent is not a weed killer and never will work as such.
How 'bout this.... I'll take their word for it and all of the other independent, scientifically based, peer reviewed research. Btw, everyone agrees, 20 per 1000 or 100 per 5000.
http://www.gluten.iastate.edu /
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/biopesticides/ingredients/factsheets/factsheet_100137.htm
http://www.pesticide.org/pubs/alts/cgm/cornglutenmeal.html
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"If they are selling it, I sure wouldn't take their word for it. " Why would the purposly mislead you to buy less of their product?
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Thanks. Read up on their FAQ and they agree ... no impact on the clover since it only restricts seed germination.
5. What weeds is it most effective controlling? What about clover?
99.9% of all broad leaf weed seeds will not germinate (grass seed germination is inhibited as well, see below). The most common pesky weeds that corn gluten meal controls is CRAB GRASS, CHICK WEED, and DANDELIONS. It will NOT have any effect on clover, as clover grows and spreads from its root system. Clover does not flower and drop seed buds, so it cannot be controlled by a pre-emergent herbicide.
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