Enjoy those Gardens and Flowers....We May Be Running Short on Time

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We could be heading for a massive die-off, and I'm not talkin' bout the bees.......I'm talkin' 'bout us.
I know this has been talked to death, but solutions aren't appearing, whilst excuses are rampant.
Charlie ------------------
http://alternet.org/environment/53491 /
Colony Collapse: Do Massive Bee Die-Offs Mean an End to Our Food System as We Know it?
Excerpt:
"It is real," argued Dewey M. Caron, professor of entomology at the University of Delaware and one of several authorities investigating the issue with the Mid-Atlantic Apiculture Research and Extension Consortium's Colony Collapse Disorder Working Group (MAAREC). "We surveyed a few states and figured out that half to three-fourths of a million bee colonies have died. This is no urban legend. It is serious."
What is so serious is not only that the bees themselves are dying off without a smoking gun present, but that most people have no idea of the role they play in the food supply at large. Commercial beehives pollinate over a third of America's crops, and that web of nourishment encompasses everything from fruits like peaches, apples, cherries, strawberries and more, to nuts like California almonds, 90 percent of which are helped along by the honeybees. Without this annual pollination, you could conceivably kiss those crops goodbye, to say nothing of the honey bees produce or the flowers they also fertilize.
But as the world has grown, so has its hunger and crowds, which has paved the way for the death of wild pollinators as well as the importation of honeybees from different climates in order to have massive crop pollination.
In the case of California's aforementioned almonds, the largest managed pollination event in the world, the growing season occurs in February, well before local hives have suitably increased their populations to handle the pollination load. As a result, the region is increasingly dependent on the importation of hives from warmer climates.
The same goes for apple crops in New York, Washington and Michigan, as well as blueberries in Maine. Almonds alone require more than one-third of all the managed honeybees in the United States, so it's entirely possible that the honeybees may have already been stretched to the breaking point, as far as environmental and chemical stressors are concerned. In fact, it's safe to say that the nation's honeybees, already a tireless lot, are totally exhausted from work.
"The honeybee is so important for pollination of hundreds of agricultural crops, because humans have made it so," Caron explained. "We destroyed the natural pollinators, plowed up the area they needed to live and continued to replace their habitats with strip malls and housing developments. So, farmers have come to rely on honeybees because of mushrooming human populations and our own destructive habits to the natural ecology."
And not just here, either: The disappearance is under way across the world. Regions of Iran are experiencing the same phenomenon, as are countries like Poland, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Germany and more every day, including Latin American and Asia. The breadth of the problem suggests that a major environmental balance could be to blame -- what else is new? -- yet no authority will sign off on the possibility and the specific causes still remain unknown.
"Other countries are also experiencing serious declines of honeybee colonies," said Maryann Frazier, senior extension associate at MAAREC and the department of entomology at Penn State University. "But we are not certain that the cause behind the losses here in the United States are the same as those causing [losses] in other parts of the world."
Throw in the fact that this type of thing has been recorded as a regular occurrence since the 19th century, and you have an apiary mystery of mammoth proportions.
"Bee colonies die all the time," Caron added. "They die over winter, lose queens, are destroyed by pests or diseases. But this is different, as the bees are simply gone and do not develop normally."
"We have had honeybee die-offs in the past which may or may not be related to the current situation," said Frazer. "However, they seem to be getting more severe. If the problem of honeybee health isn't addressed quickly, there could be serious consequences."
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Guess it's time for me to build that mason bee house that was mentioned here(I think it was this ng anyways) a while ago...we got quite a few bees/wasps/yellowjackets etc on our property(along with butterflies, mosquitoes, robins, widdle woodpeckers, occassionally a wild duck with her babies)...but this isn't a 'highly developed' area, and we have a few lilac bushes plus some tulips/daffodils/wild roses, and an apple tree that finally started leafing/blooming this year, our raspberry plants which have blossomed, and 2 cherry trees...not to mention wildflowers occassionally popping up(I make it a point to personally water the pretty ones)...though I wonder if they get confused by the fake flowers the neighbors have in their yard in pots...
<Charlie> wrote in message

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On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 02:09:56 GMT, "Lilah Morgan"

It sure is Lilah. You go. Your doin' well and leaning well.
Yeah, the mason bee house was posted here by yours truly. We have to take whatever steps necessary, large or small. to try and overcome what has been forced upon us. Often I don't have much hope, but I see you and many others doing what they can, and it does give me some hope, and certainly much comfort. I fear greatly for my children and grandchildren. For all of us.
You're doing right, keep at it. You make me laugh when I think of fake flowers and the places I have seen people display them.
You go, and take care, of yourself and yours Charlie
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Dinosaurs lasted for hundreds of millions of years and we're going into the lockers after only a little over a million years? So much for symbolic thought and opposable thumbs.
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (I love mass movements. Shame that it's an extinction.)
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wrote:

But just maybe we'll have enough time to enjoy this season's tomatoes and and last year's wine, my friend.
To life, to now Prosit Charlie
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Anstossen
Bis morgen, - Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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[snipped wonderful gardening stuff]
though I | wonder if they get confused by the fake flowers the neighbors have in their | yard in pots...
My biggest pet peeve of all time. What are they thinking? Real flowers never get confused. Only silly people do that. ;)
Kimberly
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<Charlie> wrote in message

Okay, I'll bite. What is the natural pollinator for wheat and corn, our largest crops that feed both us and our meat producing animals, and make fuel to boot? These gone, yep, major problems for us. Dave
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wrote:

Grasses (corn) and most grains are self-pollinating, Dave. That is one of the fears, that mankind may have to adapt to a diet that is based more upon grains. But so much land is being converted to biofuel production.
The whole biofuel issue is a *bad thing*. Food is being removed from diets and pumped into fuel tanks. People are already going hungry and being displaced, and killed, over the rush to biofuel prduction.
It is a serious issue that appears we have no answer for at the moment. It is seriously underfunded, as far as research goes.
Perhaps Gaia has had enough of us. Endgame.
Care, and love like there is no tomorrow, for perhaps there aren't too many more
Charlie
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Between the natural gas for fertilizers and the petroleum for insecticides and fuel to get it to market, we get about a calorie out for every OPEC calorie put in. Clever? The oil companies look green for giving us bio-fuels? Puleeese. It is a freakin' giant rip off and all our representatives are playing(?) dumb. Just say "bah" and follow the sheep in front of you.

- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (Sheldon is a jerk)
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wrote:

You think anyone is listenin' to us, Billy?

When the last living thing
has died on account of us,
how poetical it would be
if Earth could say,
in a voice floating up
perhaps
from the floor
of the Grand Canyon,
"It is done."
People did not like it here.
--Kurt Vonnegut
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at the blue sky and down at the green rolling prairie and say, "What stupid fools." And no one, except for a few archeologists, will ever will think about us again, or should.
I'm outta here. Go to bed big guy.
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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wrote:

Can't do it yet, Billy.
Sleep is a luxury for me.
Good Night, Sweet Prince.
Charlie
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On Jun 17, 3:15 am, Charlie wrote:

Man, and I thought my boys were up late.............you trying to "hang" with the young'ns Charlie?
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On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 04:33:44 -0700, raeannsimpson

heh...missed this one......just a few days late in reply!
Yeah, ya gotta stay up late to keep ahead of you youngsters.
Is your time stamp correct? People really arise at this time?
Yeah, I'm a "night owl". Always have been. I enjoy the quietness of the night hours and the lack of busyness. The winding down..... prolonged. Few intrusions upon the peace. A time for reflection and thought with few interruptions.
A time to listen to the garden growing. Things happen there in the night. Things we miss in the bright light of day.
Perhaps not the healthiest of habits, but one of several necessary ones for me.
Care, and enjoy the Dawn Charlie
--
Morning has broken, like the first morning
Blackbird has spoken, like the first bird
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<Charlie> wrote in message

what time hubby gets in.) I usually let wyatt stay up to see his daddy if hubby is running late in the fields, cause daddy is long gone when wyatt wakes up. Hubby in bed right after supper & bath. Usually by 10:30 at the latest. Breanna is generally asleep for the first part of the night 9-9:30. I have to wait til wyatt's in bed so I can "pick-up" his stuff. I get to bed by 11-11:30 if lucky. Then up at various times of the night with the baby's feedings, and up at 5AM with hubby for his b-fast, I go back to bed most times after he goes to work, then back up with Bre around 6:30AM!

Enjoy your sleep! Rae
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Thank heaven, I'm not young anymore. Now I want to be Maurice Chevalier.
--
Billy
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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Way off subject. French movie called "Le Bal". No French spoken. Covers about forty years of French history through a Bal Musette. Repertory cast plays different characters during different periods. The parts I like best, strangely enough, is the old guy opening up and then at the end, closing down. The 2 periods of calm in his day. Reminds me of working in tasting rooms.
--
Billy
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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wrote:

Working in a tasting room, though I have no clear idea how it works, is pictured in my mind as a rather holy, monastic experience. If I am off base, don't ruin the vision for me. If it is not as I envision, well.....it should be.
Friar Charlie
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Used to do some mean 4 part Gregorian Chants. "Lydah Rose, oh, Lydah Rose",
--
Billy
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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