Egg shells as plant food

Page 2 of 2  


If foliage is yellow, and not due to iron or nitrogen deficiency, suspect Mg shortage. Hard to overdose with dolomite.
A spoonful of epsom salts is recommended when planting tomatoes or peppers. These appreciate an extra dose of magnesium.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/30/12 6:14 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Yellowing can by a symptom of zinc deficiency, especially with citrus and gardenias. Yellowing can also be a symptom of soil that is too alkaline or of over-watering. Finally, yellowing can be a sign that a nearby underground natural gas line is leaking.
Magnesium promots the growth of new shoots. That is why I give each of my roses about 2 tablespoonsful of Epsom salts in the late winter.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And airplane and cars have wheels, but can a car fly?
Very specifically it depends doesn't it? Your using a false analogy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Put a big enough engine on it, no problem.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Very incorrect statement.

No,Not in my soil or many of the myriad clay compositions.
You obviously do not understand soil science and as I said you are using false analogies. Again I said airplane and cars have wheels, but can a car fly?

You coyly reply > "Put a big enough engine on it, no problem."
But old son, you would be hard pressed to find the horsepower necessary to make your overreaching BS fly:

Patently false and I think you know that, or at least you should know as much, when dispensing "gardening advice."

Again, so patently false. While it may not affect some and even benefit some others, it is no panacea. And yes you can overdo dolomite. In fact,this mythologycan be quite detrimental to many. So to say "... A spoonful of Epsom ...is recommend when planting ...." Is 100% USDA Prime BS.
Even a quick search yields this refutation: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/cabarrus/staff/dgoforth/limefaq.html#L16 :
You normally use dolomitic lime on sandy soils. Sandy soils don't have any way to hold magnesium or calcium. Both are needed for plant growth and should be added regularly. The only way to tell which lime you need to use on clay soils is with a soil test. Clay soils with high magnesium levels perform poorly. They will develop more cracks and have a tighter structure. These soils don't need additional magnesium. Look for the magnesium base saturation (Mg BS) percentage on a soil test. The ideal Mg BS is 10%. Clay soils with Mg BS over 20% should get calcitic lime. ...
Also see: http://www.kinseyag.com/Article2.htm http://www.smilinggardener.com/organic-soil-management/dolomite-lime http://back-to-basics.net/efu/pdfs/pH.pdf http://pubs.cas.psu.edu/FreePubs/pdfs/uc038.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.