Easter Lily question

I bought a supermarket Easter Lily, which is delightfully perfuming my front room now. Will I be able to transplant it into my yard and have it survive? I live in Boston, MA, zone 6, USA.
Thanks!
Priscilla
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certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
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Hey, Priscilla, long time no read!
Yes, you can plant it outside, and pray those damned red lily beetles don't fine them! :o(
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Hey, hey, yourself! Nice to be recognized. ;-)

I've got a whole new front to my property. No more overgrown bushes and stuff -- five lovely raised beds with river rock in between. Last fall a friend and I planted a couple hundred bulbs in there, and I think there are a few lilies, but I can't remember. I'll just have to be surprised! :-) Things are already shooting up, but darned if I can tell who they are yet.
When stuff's up I'll find a good spot for Ms. Easter Lily somewhere there.
Thanks! (Doncha just love that lily smell?)
Priscilla in Roslindale
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"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
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I sure do, my whole house smells loverly right now :o)
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Ahhhhhh! <contented sigh>
Priscilla ("How many hours 'til the Vigil?")
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"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
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The Easter lilies do fine outside (NH), but what about those RED BUGS that appeared last year and can eat a whole plant in one day. What deters them??
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Squish them, they actually squeal! <G>
Actually, a systemic is about the only thing that really works. Merit, or other grub control. I've tried neem, doesn't do much. Handpicking the disgusting feces covered larvae diligently works some, but you'll have to give up your day job to keep up with it if you've got a good collection. I've thrown in the towel for now on them. They're working on some biological/predator controls but they haven't got there yet.
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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expounded:

AYE that IS the problem in New England, now.... those damned red-lily beetles have become a worse scourge for me than the Japanese Beetles or the Rose Chafers.
Sue Western Maine

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Oh, dear. I'm afraid I'll be learning about them this year, since I'm quite sure that some of what I put in my new raised beds was lilies. :-(
Priscilla
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"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
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Up there too, Sue? We've got a house in southwestern Maine, I hadn't tried lilies there yet. It's in the middle of a pine barren, maybe the little bastiges won't find them??!?
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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expounded:

Ann, sorry to say, yes the little bastiges are here in abundance, and I'm in West Bethel.
Sue
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So far my experiences with planting "Easter Lilies" in the garden have been good ones. They do require a deep mulching the first couple of winters, but after that they seem to do very well in my Zone 5a gardens.
CV is, therefore partially correct, since they do need to be deeply mulched and perhaps planted a bit deeper than the Asiatic, Orientals and others that are more commonly grown in our gardens.
Another Lily you will probably find as a blooming pot plant this time of year are the LA Hybrids (Longifolium X Asiatic ) They also should be mulched the first winter or so, but they make a lovely addition to the garden. I find it is better to keep them growing in the pots they came in until they have gone dormant and then plant them in the garden. That way it is much easier to plant them deeper than you do other Liliums. Some will even come into growth after a couple of weeks and present you with a fall bloom or two. Perfect drainage is a must for these.
Hemma
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Lilium longiflorum is actually an autumn flowering species native to Taiwan and would not be cold hardy in Boston without extra protection.
A Google search should turn up something on the species.

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Cereus-validus..... wrote:

http://extension-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/publications/lily/lily.html
Says: Lilium longiflorum, the Latin name for the Easter Lily, is native to the Ryukyu Islands of southern Japan. The Easter Lily industry is an American success story. Prior to 1941, the majority of the Easter Lily bulbs were exported to the United States from Japan. World War II eliminated the dependence on Japanese-produced bulbs and commercial bulb production shifted to the U.S. The Japanese have never been able to regain any of their lost market share due to the superior quality of the U.S.-grown bulbs.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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Untrue, I've had them in my garden for years. Until the beetles ate them. Nothing unhardy about them.
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Ann wrote:

They're hardy in zone 5 too. But it might be to cold for the beetles here, cause I've never had that problem.
Jeana
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visited me, she tucked a bulb of her own prodgeny into my new BBQ pit garden (before Squire made the fountain) and it flowers in late May, early June......not Easter.........but my Blood Lilies and Korean Crinum that Zhan gave me (the Crinum, not the Blood Lily) are blooming right now, as is the "Cherokee Pipe" plant, a Caladiva Kalanchole that is red, and I couldn't resist a Stargazer which has it's last two blossoms perfuming my nook as I write. And we can't forget the small pot of Campanula I just HAD to have............................ madgardener
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