Earthworms

I want to raise earthworms, both for the garden, and for bait. I am sure that all it would take is some good soil, but would appreciate any cites to sites that would help me sight in on this project. I have seen where a chest freezer is buried, and filled with earthworm compatible things, and the freezer helps to contain them so they are easy to harvest.
Anyone do this? Right now, when we come back from fishing, we dump them in the garden at specific spots, but we really need to get in there and rip the soil, because I fear it has one foot of soil, then a caliche hardpan. Just really condition the soil in the whole of the garden, and start right from square one. I can live with a foot or so of good soil for most crops, but might have to dig a hole with the backhoe for the fridge to have a worm hotel.
Help appreciated.
Steve
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You needn't build anything... for fishing woims all you need do is hose down a small area and sprinkle some dry cereal (oatmeal) on the wet ground in late afternoon and the next morning well before sun up bring a flashlight outside, you should see more than sufficient night crawlers for a full day of fishing.
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Steve B wrote:

In looking for information be clear that what you are reading is about earthworms. There are many vendors selling and providing information about compost worms (red worms, tiger worms) which are not the same.
Earthworms eat decaying vegetable matter in the soil so you need to improve the organic content to a high level. I see no reason why one foot deep would not be adequate. The idea of containing the worms may make it easier to catch them but how will you renew their food once they have processed the whole thing? This also seems to miss out on the benefit of allowing the worms to improve the structure of your garden soil. If you keep a high level of organic matter in your soil and prevent it from drying out you should have plenty to fish with.
D
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Steve B wrote:

much fun. :) see my previous posts Subject: worm composting and veggie scraps...
songbird
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On Thu, 6 Sep 2012 20:25:38 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Were it an honest question you'd not have needed to announce it.
There are many types of earthworms on the planet. You need to educate yourself instead of always doubting those who know, look it up, there're plenty of sources on the net... you'll be amazed.
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Higgs Boson wrote:

More than two. They are divided roughly into two groups, those that live in earth and those that live in compost. The conditions for growing are somewhat different and they are not interchangeable.
D
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This is fascinating! Do you mean there are two different species? Or just that they operate in different media. Straight question. _____________________________________ Actually there are many species of worms. Australia even has a giant one - rare now but over 6 ft long apparently - it is found in areas of Gippsland in Victoria:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NxeT_GDKv9g

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This is fascinating! Do you mean there are two different species? Or just that they operate in different media. Straight question. _____________________________________ Actually there are many species of worms. Australia even has a giant one - rare now but over 6 ft long apparently - it is found in areas of Gippsland in Victoria:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NxeT_GDKv9g

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