Drying Out Potted Plants

What is the best way to dry out a plant's soil (without drying out the plant) after flushing or overwatering?
If anyone has any tips, that would be great.
It seems to me that the greatest obstacle to flushing plants in soil, is that the soil remains wet for far too long.
Alex
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The soil make up can vary from course sand to store bought potting soil and everything in between. Course dry's out fast. Then there is vermiculite etc. Potting mixture requires study. Pot shards in your pot to encourage drainage seems the rigor.
I think that large pot size can deal withy mistakes better than small pots.
We soak our orchids once a week and mist on occasion. All of this is dependent on time of the year which effects humidly and light. Other plants are watered according to their nature and we have killed quite a few in our time.
I guess there are electronic water determining devices but I am ignorant of them. Still amazed that I can get a stud finder to work.
Bill
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wrote:

Drain off the saucer. Place in a well-ventilated area, but keep in mind that some plants resent being moved. Some morning sunlight helps. A clay pot dries much faster than a plastic or glazed pot. Of course it's best not to overwater most plants and it will quickly kill some. When I give a plant a "shower" I protect the top of the pot using aluminum foil.
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Just Asking wrote:

The correct potting mix is the key. My do-it-yourself recipe is for a mix that drains well and does not get soggy unless, of course, the pot is set in standing water. Even then, as soon as the pot is removed from standing water, the mix drains and does not remain soggy.
See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_potting_mix.html .
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Thanks, I'll try this combination. :)
It seems like soil would be perfect, if you could flush it now and then and clean out any excess fertilizer or whatever builds up in the bottom of the container.
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Just Asking wrote:

I had that "over wet" problem last year with Dahlia tuber sprouts.....
Replace the soil immediately. Use new, dry potting soil, not new, potting mix !!
I had many, many fungus gnats in my basement & in my sun room.
Yes, I did lose about 50% of my 350 young Dahlias to black stem rot. It cost me $13 per 20" healthy Dahlia plant at at a local Wisc. greenhouse on June 1, 06 to replace my 30 Dahlia Garden weaklings.... As a result of the stem rot, I gave very few Dahlia plants to Neighbors & relatives.
My new problem is that I dried out 50% of my 90 Stored Dahlia Tuber clumps. More tuber & plant purchases are in my May 07 schedule..
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Sprinkling ground cinnamon on the soil will immediately eliminate the gnats and keep the eggs from hatching and won't harm any of your plants. Works like a charm. This trick was taught to me by a fellow who had a huge green house and extensive orchid collection. I've been doing this for years with great success. I bought a huge bottle of ground cinnamon from the dollar store and keep it in my garden bag.
Val
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