Drip Irrigation and Landscaping Fabric

Hi!
I am going to be installing a drip irrigation system for my shrubs. Some sites say to install the lines above the mulch, while others say below it. I think I'm going to install it below the mulch so that the lines aren't visible.
My question though is should you install it above or below the landscaping fabric, or does it matter? I purchased the rainbird drip irrigation kit, if that matters.
Thanks!
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When I put in a drip system for some intense hill side planting I put the system under the landscape fabric. However....because of previous experience [learn from the mistakes of others, you won't live long enough to make them all yourself], when I laid down the fabric (over the lines) I made sure the emitter was firmly in it's little spike holder thingy and was not covered with fabric or mulch. Those emitters are easily clogged (even with a filter in the lines) and I found that over a period of time you need to be able to not only visually check performance but to be able to pop them off the lines to clean them out. If they are all covered up how would you be able to know if they quite dripping?
The theory on putting the system under the mulch, other than aesthetics, is that it will cut down on evaporation. They don't spray or mist, they drip a short distance directly into the ground. I don't think evaporation is really an issue. I almost always turned them on at night or very early morning anyway. There isn't a problem with disease caused by watering since the water doesn't hit the plant or splash back up. Cover up the spaghetti of lines with cloth first, it keeps them from working their way out of the mulch, but keep their little heads up.
Val

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In article

My feeling is that the quicker the water gets into the ground the better. You may need to check your drip lines (once a year) to make sure they aren't being blocked. If that is a problem, put it on top.
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Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
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Thanks for the information. I think that I will run all the water lines under the fabric, and have the emitters accessible above ground.
Thanks for the great information!!!

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I've had a drip irrigation system for years. This year, when I tested it, I found one of the connectors had developed a crack. Since mine is above the cloth, but under the mulch, replacement of the connector was simple. Had it been under the fabric, it would have been a lot more work. Also, over the years, I have made some changes to the landscape, and have had to add or relocate emitters, which again was easy as the line was easy to reach under the mulch but above the cloth.
So unless you are certain that nothing will ever break, and that you will never alter the landscaping, I think keeping the lines easily accessable is an important consideration.
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