Does Ranunculus come back?

I put a bunch of yellow Ranunculus about 1-1/2 months ago; cost me quite a bit. They looked gorgeous, then began shedding blooms.
Question: Do they re-bloom? I have little experience with bulbs, etc; perennials where you have to dig up & replant next year. Doesn't seem like they should be ending so fast. This is So. Calif coastal; a mild Mediterranean climate.
What research I have done on-line seems to say that they DO bloom "through midsummer".
I took pix, but now can't find them <g>
Anybody in a comparable climate have input on this?
HB
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On 4/5/11 5:24 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Please remind me: What is your "comparable climate"?
My ranunculus bloom once a year. They are blooming right now.
I groom (deadhead) them as the petals fall, leaving the foliage. When the foliage dies and the long stems dry out, I gently pull the stems out of the soil, leaving the tubers in the ground. They boom again the following spring.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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I'm in Santa Monica, about a mile from the beach.

Area looks like dog-doo.
Nie wieder!
Now I have to wait around, if I understood you right, to pull out the stems, leaving the tubers in the ground, TAKING UP THE SPACE that more cooperative plants could have occupied! I can't leave that area vacant for a whole ****ing YEAR!. Instead of leaving tubers in the ground, can I pull them out and replant them next year (if we are all spared)?
If so:
a. How should I store them?
b. Given that the ones I bought at the nursery may well have been "forced", how can I anticipate when to replant the tubers? My micro- climate and yours are not quite the same. I answered that above -- I'm in Santa Monica, about a mile from the beach, and I think you're in the Valley somewhere?
TIA
HB
HB

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Ranunculus tubers should be planted in October or November. Contrary to some, the dry tubers do not need to be soaked in water before planting. There should be some bone meal under the tubers but not touching them.
I would leave them in the ground. The survival rate is better than if you remove them.
As long as you don't plant directly on top of a dormant tuber, you can plant summer annuals near them. When the annuals die, cut them down; don't pull them out, which might pull out ranunculus tubers that have become entangled in the annuals' roots.
My garden is planted with perennials, bulbs, shrubs, subshrubs, and ground cover. I have ranunculus in my rose bed along with freesias and narcissus. The bed also contains evergreen daylilies, narcissus, cuphea, primroses, low Camellia sasanqua, and blue fescue. The back of the bed has dwarf Burford holly. One end has a clump of pink Penstemon. The entire bed is covered with pink clover (Persicaria).
The ranunculus, freesias, and narcissus bloom only in the late winter and into the spring, before the roses and daylilies bloom. When they die down and go dormant, the rest of the plants in the bed provide more than enough interest.
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Climate: California Mediterranean
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I didn't know about the optimum planting time. Never planted tubers before AFAIK. As mentioned earlier, I bought the ranunculus from the nursery when they were in full, gorgeous bloom, which didn't last very ****ing long! Live & learn!

Sounds gorgeous; well thought out.

I think it was you who advised the pink clover? Whoever it was, I did put in a LOT of them in a back area between several large planters. Helps define an area that would otherwise look somewhat desolate. Coming along nicely. I understand they spread on their own, yay!

Thanks for that. However, I'm going to try for some perennials in that area rather than annuals. Something bright yellow (sort of a theme in this area).
*** Any suggestions? ***
As to the ****ing ranunculus, I just don't want to be bothered with a few months of bloom in exchange for most of the year barren. As soon as the foliage dies, per your earlier advice, I plan to take up the tubers and put them somewhere where they can do their thing less obtrusively.
Your input much appreciated.
HB
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On 4/8/11 6:14 PM, Higgs Boson wrote [in part]:

There are some yellow daylilies (Hemerocallis) that seem to bloom almost year round. They're sort of a golden yellow, almost yellow-orange. They don't bloom continuously. Instead, they repeatedly bloom, rest, and bloom again from late winter until the end of fall. Be sure you get an evergreen variety, not a deciduous one that goes dormant in the winter.
Bush daisies (Euryops pectinatus) do bloom all year. At Gardens of the World in Thousand Oaks, they bloom continuously year round. These can grow tall and belong in the background. They should be pruned in the late spring or early summer to prevent them from becoming leggy; this, however, will eliminate flowers for a short while.
Primroses (in particular, Primula polyantha) have a long bloom period from spring through summer, again on and off. There are varieties with yellow flowers and blue flowers with yellow eyes. These are low-growing, best in the foreground.
Consider Alstroemeria. Mine are never out of bloom. I've seen a variety that has flowers that are yellow with orange (or is it orange with yellow?).
All four should do quite well in Santa Monica.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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On 4/8/11 11:08 PM, David E. Ross wrote:

I forgot calendula (C. officinalis), which has yellow-flowered varieties that bloom much of the year. Also, there are various types of Gazania with yellow flowers, including a trailing variety with green-gray foliage. Finally, there are several perennial species and hybrids of Coreopsis with either single or double yellow flowers.
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Climate: California Mediterranean
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