Do I remove the containers?

Hello, I have plants in what looks like recycled paper or cardboard, possibly degradable containers.
What are these made of and should I remove these before planting?
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On Tue, 17 Jul 2007 18:18:41 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

They say to plant in containers and they will degrade.
I don't plant the containers. I remove plants from containers and plant normally. IMHO, the container gimmick is for lazy, trendy gardeners.
When I remove container, I do it over large newspaper, because there's a ton of spaghetti-looking paper-ish stuff around the root.
Persephone
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Persephone wrote:

Actually, it isn't. It is a method to prevent damage to the roots of tender plants. It also makes it easier to handle and plant very small plants and seedlings. There's nothing new about these containers. My grandmother made them out of paper, and they've been made from peat for use in seed starting for quite a long time.

That's odd. You're finding this in standard degradable peat containers?
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On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 17:21:08 -0600, Pennyaline

You're talking, above, about damage to "very small plants and seedlings". Maybe a failure to communicate? I was talking about large, robust plants like bare-root roses (see above). They are, in fact, full of "spaghetti-looking paper-ish stuff".
I can see why little containers might help with "tender plants', so I guess we were looking at different sizes & types.
Pax
Persephone
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Persephone wrote:

D'oh!
Why don't they recommend planting bare root roses with bare roots? It's easy enough to do.
For plants as large as those, I'm with you. Take the degradable pot and whatever material other than roots and soil is there out. Put what's left into the ground.
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Pennyaline wrote:

I think you are better off retaining as much of the original soil as possible
when planting. Less chance of the roots being exposed to the air and drying out. Also, for certain plants like Paw Paws, there are certain organisms near the plant roots supporting it's growth, so you don't want to remove those.
Sherwin
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sherwindu wrote:

Right, but bare root plants have little to no soil around them. And my statement was to remove whatever material that is not roots and soil. My experience with bare root plants is that they come with truly bare roots and wrapped in plastic to prevent drying. They are soaked, then planted. Anything that comes in soil is, to my mind, not bare rooted.

True for many plants, but they come in soil and not as bare root plants in degradable containers.
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That paperish stuff is commonly used to ship plants, but usually for dry root ones. My guess is that these pieces are soaked with water at the shipper with the thought that they will help retain moisture in shipment.
Although these degradable containers are supposed to dissolve over time, I try to remove them whenever possible. Even with larger plants, you can maneuver the plant into destination hole and then carefully cut the sides and slip the whole thing away from the plant. At worst, you will lose a little soil, but it will give the roots an easier time to reach out into their new surroundings.
Sherwin
Persephone wrote:

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Now is not a great time for planting. Yes, remove the container. If you are a professional.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.

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symplastless wrote:

You don't have to be a professional to remove the containers. What's the big deal?
Sherwin
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