Dilution ratio for Bayer Season Long Grub Control????????

Hi all:
Three years ago I bought the Bayer Season Long Grub Control. Product comes in a "hose end sprayer" bottle ready to attach to your hose. Only thing is, after the first year the female hose end attachment point on the bottle began popping off when the water started, rendering the sprayer useless.
I have a lot of this product left, and the 32 oz bottle was darned expensive. I'd like to just pour the bottle contents into a regular hose-end spayer, but I don't know the proper dilution to select. There's nothing on the bottle and Bayer refuses to say.
Anybody know what a proper dilution ratio for this product might be?
TIA.
Tom Young
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Call Bayer

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Jangchub wrote:

I did. Hence "...and Bayer refuses to say."
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Ask to speak to a supervisor, and another, then another. If no results, instruct them to reimburse you for the faulty sprayer, which could've burst and sprayed the crap in your face. Tell them your lawyer might like to know about that.
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On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 01:21:22 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

OR, guess OR do the responsible thing and don't use it.
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The latter would be preferable, but someone told the OP the stuff was OK to use, and as we all know, corporations are more trustworthy than our mothers.
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On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 13:21:03 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

If there is no label, I don't use it.
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wrote:

Label or not, these things cannot be tested properly for safety, although the manufacturers love to reinvent the definition of "tested properly".
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On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 12:37:06 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

I haven't used pesticides in decades. I should say, I haven't used synthetic pesticides. However, I have not had the need to use organic methods either for the entire seven years in this house. The beneficial insects and other macro organisms far outweigh the pests.
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TomYoung wrote:

The bottle should say what strength the product is in the bottle. For example:
Active Ingredient: Diazinon:[O,O-diethyl O-(2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl) phosphorothioate].............. 47.5% Inert Ingredients*............ 52.5% *contains xylene range aromatic solvent Contains 4 lbs Diazinon per gallon KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN
Find another bottle of the same chemical that's already diluted in a ready-to-use sprayer, or a concentrate with directions how to mix it. You can calculate the dilution ratio from that.
For a hose-on application, the dilution rate is not so critical anyway.
Also, the sprayer bottle might tell you how many square feet it covers. You can figure out a guesstimate just from that info.
Best regards, Bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

Hi Bob:
Thanks for the reply.
I'll admit, I've never understood the whole "covers so many square feet" and dilution ratio issues. For example, this bottle has 1.47% of active ingredients, 98.53% inactive. The bottle says it covers 5,000 sq. ft. and it has 32 oz of product in it.
So, I know that each sq. ft. of my lawn needs a dose of 0.0064 oz. of product (32/5000.)
If I dilute at a gallon of water to an ounce of product and my lawn is 300 sq. ft. then it needs 1.92 ounces of product (.0064 x 300) which means I spray about 2 gallons of my product/water mixture.
If I dilute at 100 gallons of water to an ounce of product then I need to spray about 200 gallons of my product/water mixture.
The two things that have always puzzled (because I'm not a green thumb and have never studied these things) are:
1. How does the dilution ratio affect the efficacy of the product? I'm certain it does; after all, if I spread 2 gallons of water over 300 sq. ft. I'm pretty sure that it would evaporate before ever getting down to where it needs to work. On the other hand, if I spray 200 gallons over the lawn perhaps the concentration of "active ingredient" is so small that when it sinks to the activity zone it has no effect. Hence, your suggestion to find another product with the same active ingredients?
2. How do I know how many gallons per minute I'm spraying, so I know how fast to walk over my lawn and when to stop? The instructions that came with the hose end sprayer doesn't say. Is this a situation where you need to do a test, like spraying water into a 5-gallon bucket, so you know your gallons per minute?
Thanks again.
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wrote:

Diazinon is illegal and was phased off the market because of its toxicity.
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Jangchub wrote:

It was just an example of what a label might look like. I don't know what the active ingredient in that Bayer stuff is, so I picked a diazinon label.
Bob
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wrote:

Probably their favorite difulsate. Grubs can be very effectively managed with the use of beneficial nematodes.
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