Diazinon replacements...not!

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I moved this year and the new house had a poor lawn. I have much improved it but I am having grub problems. I have tried 3 of the products now in the stores: season lawn control, triacide?, and sevin. None have worked, peel up a patch of sod and I still see live grubs each time!
Diazanon worked without fail in the past but is now unavailable. Any suggestions for something that really works. (Other than a 55 gal drum of Malathion concentrate applied directly. That is what the guy at the local home center jokenly reccommended.)
Jim
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germ wrote:

I wish I'd known that diazanon was being outlawed -- I would have bought a gallon of it like I did dursban. I still have about a pint of 50% diazanon; that ought to last me a long time cuz I don't use it much (I just like to have it available.)
I think there's a natural grub killer call "milky spore". I don't know much about it because grubs are not a big problem here.
Or maybe you just need to turn some moles loose in your yard.
Best regards, Bob
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That or letting your lawn grow a little longer closer to 4 inches and the starlings would like to come in and help out a little. Colleen Zone 5 CT
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Actually, a single armadillo can rid your lawn of grubs in less than a week.
I purchased liquid diazinon a couple of months ago at either Lowes or Home Depot. When did it get banished?

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Do you think they outlawed it because of it's greatness? It is a neurotoxin and can kill you, cause cancer, and a whole host of other neuro diseases. How silly people are.
V
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escapee wrote:

I think they outlawed it because stupid people were spraying it on golf courses (against the label directions) and killing people, or broadcasting it by the hundreds of pounds on their lawns whether they had grubs or not and contaminating the ground water. I don't think they banned it because I use it once or twice every July to spray my apple tree to prevent apple maggots because malathion isn't strong enough. (it is listed for this.)
Bob
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neurotoxin and

How silly

A few years ago while visiting my home town nursery, I saw a grandpa and grandma buying sacks of every pesticide in the place. Malthion, diazinon, you name it. They mentioned that their grandkids were coming over for the weekend and they were making the yard nice for them to play in........ Better living through chemical cocktails.........

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I don't care what you "think." I care that diazinon was marketed in about 40 different trade names, sold in different type bottles, by different companies and what's more stunning is that you use it anywhere, let alone on something you will eat.
Do as you will. I find your glib answer alarming and if this remotely represents how people in the world feel about neurotoxins, organophosphate's and the like, it's frightening.
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escapee wrote:

I'm glad I didn't mention my stash of 74% chlordane (I'm saving it, just in case I ever have to deal with termites)
Bob
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Minnesota Statutes 2003, Table of Chapters
Table of contents for Chapter 18B
18B.115 Sale or use of chlordane or heptachlor.
The state, a state agency, a political subdivision of the state, a person, or other legal entity may not sell, use, or apply the pesticide chlordane or its derivative heptachlor within the state.
HIST: 1989 c 326 art 5 s 28
Copyright 2003 by the Office of Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota.
Consider yourself reported Mr Bxxon, Olmsted County has vigorous inforcement......
wrote:

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tomjasz wrote:

GFY. It doesn't say anything about possession of chlordane.
Minnesota doesn't have a subterranean termite problem worthy of chlordane use, but I don't intend to live here after I retire.
regards, bob
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Nothing about possession you say? Goodness, you're right. Not quite busted yet then. ;-)
Jim
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wrote:

Interesting that you're concerned about ironite but willing to live with chlordane. That's weird! Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets. To plant a pine, one need only own a shovel. -- Aldo Leopold
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Tom Jaszewski wrote:

Thanks for noticing. I'm a complex character. <g>
There's a variety of reasons; some of them good and some probably rather dubious. I knew what I was buying when I got the chlordane -- a persistant insecticide that kills termites. AFAIK, there are still no good alternatives on the market. So my chlordane sits in its brown bottle as a kind of insurance that I hope I never need to use.
The ironite was sold as an iron- and trace element-rich fertilizer and general plant tonic. No mention that it was mine tailings from a toxic waste dump. No mention of the high levels of lead and arsenic (or mercury, I don't recall which.)
The chlordane eventually breaks down, although it takes many years. The heavy metals contaminants in the ironite don't break down, they just become more readily available as the ironite itself breaks down.
Best regards, Bob

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wrote:
:) AFAIK, there are still no :) good alternatives on the market.
For what it's worth, most of the "old timers" that have compared chlordane with one of the newer products called Termidor, say they prefer the performance of Termidor. Fewer call backs. Has to be applied by a pro though.
Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
It is said that the early bird gets the worm, but it is the second mouse that gets the cheese.
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escapee wrote:
<snip>

Everything you see, touch, smell, hear or consume has some form of cancer causing agent in it.
Grandpa
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The damage is getting severe. I could feed an army of starlings for a month in the grubs in the front yard alone.
I pulled up about two square feet in a browning area before writing my first post and found 12-15 grubs! Not to mention my annuals look like I hit them with RoundUp, the one Nasturtium I pulled up had 3 of those parasites attached.
Jim

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month
first
them
Depending on where you are located, you are over-estimating the problem. The eastern half of the country is bothered by the larvae of June beetles and chafer bugs, but you need to see double the amount you are reporting (a dozen or more grubs per square FOOT) to have a problem that requires treatment. In the western portion of the country, the culprit is crane fly larvae, but treatment for these guys is not recommended until populations exceed 30 per square foot.
Maintaining a healthy lawn is the best remedy - grunbs will infest lawns that are stressed first. Reduce the amount of fertilizer you apply, mow long and water less often but more deeply. These practices will encourage your lawn to develop a deep root system, making it much less likely to appeal to the grubs, which feed on surface roots. Plus, lawns which are allowed to dry out between waterings make the environment inhospitable for the grubs, which require specific moisture levels to survive. The first thing you want to do is reset your irrigation system if you have one - that daily or every other day watering for 10-15 minutes is wreaking havoc. It is wasting water, encouraging shallow root development and provides the ideal conditions for grubs to proliferate. If the populations do increase to treatment levels (you are NOT there yet), beneficial nematodes are the recommended treatment, but you must time their application to the life cycle of the specific pest.
Contact your county extension agent for details. This link may help. http://www.gardenguides.com/articles/grubs.htm
btw, whatever is plaguing your annuals is unlikely to be the same problem, but the same principals apply. Avoid excessive fertilizing, stay away from chemical treatments that reduce the populations of benefical insects and water intelligently.
Anyone that favors a lawn to the point that they are willing to apply banned and extremely dangerous pesticides needs to re-examine their priorities.
pam - gardengal
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On 25 Jun 2004 16:21:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (germ) opined:

Yeah, get the soil healthy and use beneficial nematodes and you won't have grubs.
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Not sure where you're located, but I believe in this area (northwest Florida) Talstar is used with good results.
A local store that I buy from has a web site that lists various products and the appropriate usage. They're at http://www.pestproducts.com
Even if you don't buy from them, the info on the site can give you a good lead on some products you might find locally. (I can't see having a big bag of whatever shipped to you as being very cost efficient.) I'm not in any way affiliated with this store other than being a satisfied customer.
Tony
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