Dianthus Pinks -pruning -summer blooms?

My bed of Dianthus Pinks have been blooming nicely for weeks. Now all flowers are dead on 8 to 15 inch long stems. I cut off each dead blossom but do not see any new buds. I don't plan on feeding them.
Can I shorten those long stems? Is there a special place to cut and shorten each stem that will stimulate new buds and look less leggy? Any web sites that show how to shorten the long stems and where to cut? Google search was not very helpful.
Will these bloom during the summer or are they only Spring bloomers?
Thanks for hints. Dave_s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Clip them about 1/4" above the leaves below the cut. I'm in upstate NY, and mine bloomed until November with this kind of care.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
    

I do want to try your scheme. Your results are good...bloom until November!!
I don't understand "......above the cut" Ok, I am to clip [snip off] all stem beginning 1/4 inch above.. ....what cut..? Please just restate your method in a few more words.
Many thanks, Dave_s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry - I could've described that better. :-) Look beneath a dead flower to the next set of leaves, and make the cut 1/4" above those leaves. If you want the stem shorter, always make the cut 1/4" above a set of leaves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

    Very helpful explanation. Now I understand and will try your method.
    Thank you all for the info. Dave_s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave_s wrote:

Even if your pinks were sold as annuals, leave them in the ground in the fall. If the winter is not too severe they may come back even nicer next year. This past year I dug up one clump of "annual" pinks and kept them in a pot in the house all winter and then put them back in the ground once the danger of freeze was over. The clump I left out in the garden came roaring back and outbloomed the ones I'd babied. Even after they begin to grow in the spring they can survive a hard frost.
I'm in Western Massachusetts, just a few miles from the Vermont border.
--Jenny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is true. Mine never even wilted, and we had temps as low as 6 degrees Fahrenheit. Tough little plants!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.