Denver area daffodil bulbs

We bought a big bag of like 75 daffodil bulbs from Costco a couple of weeks ago.
I SHOULD have planted them then, but haven't had the time.
Is there a way I can store them and plant them next spring, so they won't dry out or die?
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If the ground is still accessible and not frozen, plant them now.
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Sarah Houston wrote:

Plant them now or regret it. When I lived in Alaska I occasionally planted bulbs so late in the season that I had to shovel snow to get to the ground and never once did I have a failure. This worked for lily, daffodil, tulip, and hyacinth. If you leave the bulbs out of the ground until next fall I really doubt that you would have any survivors.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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Sarah Houston wrote:

I lost 50 last year. Didn't feel up to dealing with them late in the preceding fall, so I gambled and stored them in the fridge the until the next fall.
They had a little mold on them, but otherwise didn't *look* too bad. My daughter planted them for me where I had by now made room, and they went in pretty easy because it was freshly tilled but still a lot of work.
Don't recommend it. Not a one came up the following spring, and when a landscaper planted my roses for me, there they were, rotted.
This year I planned better to space the work out and planted over 200 bulbs, including daffs, just not so many. So I would advise to plant them now. You might want to put an augur on a drill but the drill has to have pretty good hp. Sometimes bulb planters work, but sometimes they are tough to get deep enough. If there is sod and little moisture in the soil, forget it. Till first if you can.
I don't envy you. It will probably be cold working now.

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Sarah Houston wrote:

Sarah,
Bulbs just don't store well for long periods. Try to get them in the ground as soon as you can (before the ground is frozen).
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

Gardening for over 40 years
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Plant now! I had some conflicting work schedules and ended up with a 'seemed like a good idea at the time' bag of 200 daffodil bulbs sitting on the back porch right after Christmas. I was living in NW Montana at the time. I just shoveled the snow off the ground, used a pick ax to break through the by then frozen 4-6 inches of surface soil, not as difficult as it sounds, and dug a nice twisty, wide, long trench about 8-10 inches deep. I believe I've read some English garden books calling this style a "sweep or drift", more pleasing than soldier rows IMO, faster too. Tossed in what bulb food I had, mixed it up a bit, plunked the bulbs in, shoveled the soil back over them, slapped it down with the shovel and scraped the snow back over the trench. They not only came up in the spring they multiplied like nobody's business as long as I lived there.
Val
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