Daylily question

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On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 16:21:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@paghat.com (paghat) wrote:

Hmmmm, now I'll have to take a looksee at turks-cap lillies. The problem here is that, when spring is sprung, blazing heat follows almost immediately. My daylillies aren't blooming the way they are, so I may just dig them and cut them with a sharp knife into smaller hunks. I think what I have are 'Halls Pink' and Chicago something or another, and then there's the stand of old fashioned tiger lillies, which I adore. Especially when planted near a tall blue salvia like 'Indigo Spires.'
I'm not crazy about thinning either, but if it's between thinning or watering, I take thinning every few years or so. I think we have similar winter climates so very mild winters.
Now let me go see what a turks-cap lily looks like. Just what I need!
Victoria
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On 3/25/2008 2:07 PM, Jangchub wrote:

The answer is similar to the answer for bearded iris: Divide and transplant when bare-root plants (daylilies in this case) are available in local nurseries. This will vary according to your climate.
When you do plant, dig a generous amount of bone meal or super-phosphate into the bottom of the planting hole. Then place some plain soil on top of that. When planting, the roots should not be placed in immediate contact with any fertilizers. The phosphorus in bone meal or super-phosphate will promote flowers. However, phosphorus does not readily leach through the soil; instead, it must be placed where roots will find it.
Do not provide any nitrogen fertilizer until after new growth is seen. I would actually wait until the following year. Then, foliage growth will not put a demand for moisture on disturbed roots that cannot be satisfied. Instead, the delay allows the roots to become well established before foliage is promoted.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 20:00:24 -0800, "David E. Ross"

Thank you for the suggestions. I use certified organic fertilizer. I don't use bone meal. Since daylillies flower and leave strap leaf foliage I do want that to look nice when they are not flowering. I'll probably use fish emulsion for a nitrogen soure. I'm truly looking forward to this plant family. I'm going to look up the local club.
v
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Jangchub wrote:

I've never found anything that would stop them from blooming except for planting them in deep shade and even there they try. I have a patch growing persistently in my side yard which came about from me placing some clumps there in the shade while I hacked and whacked them into smaller clumps with a machete and a yard fork. I planted the resulting clumps elsewhere. A couple of months later I found plants growing from the shreds of unplanted roots that the hacking produced. The next summer I found one of the pitiful little things budding. This is in a _very_ shady area where I am unable to grow anything besides volunteer "wild flowers" (read that as weeds) and moss. The variety of daylily involved was typical "Tennessee Ditch Lily" of no known parentage and these plants are probably tougher than the average but I think that simply dividing a plant is unlikely to do more than slow down the blooming.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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