Daylily question

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If I dig some clumps which didn't flower last year and transplant them now, will they flower for me this year? This is my newest love. Daylillies. Oh how scrumptious they are. Oh how little needed where they are concerned. Them and crocosmia...and verbena...and...Oh forget it, I'm stil addicted.
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I did that a couple of years ago with 4 plants. Two flowered, two didn't. But, I don't think it was the transplanting that delayed two of them. Try and move as much soil as possible with the roots. Sliding the plants with their soil onto a tarp is a good way.
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On 3/25/08 6:43 PM, in article uefGj.570$ snipped-for-privacy@news02.roc.ny,

Good advice. Also, lots of water until bloom time. Some hybrids are just fussier than others. I've had plants put up new scapes after being divided while in bloom and others that sulked for a year after being moved.
C
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On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 06:26:25 -0400, Cheryl Isaak

As long as I don't kill them I'll be happy. The 'Strawberry Candy' you sent have been in gallon containers in the greenhouse all winter establishing roots. They look really healthy and wonderful. Thank you so much for them.
Are you interested in a two foot tall, rooted brugmansia in a gallon container to trade for any other pink or white/cream colored fancy's you may have?
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If you happen to be looking for an amazing yellow daylilly, get yourself a "Hyperion". Breathtaking.
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Guess you folks know about this.
Bill
<http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?seq_no_11 51021>
"Technical Abstract: All parts of the daylily (Hemerocallis sp.) are edible. Flowers can be chopped into green salads, eaten as a garnish, or deep-fried. Objectives of this project were to determine if daylily flower color or cultivar influences taste."
..................................... Research Project: VEGETABLE AND ORNAMENTAL RESEARCH IN THE GULF SOUTH Location: Poplarville, Mississippi Title: SENSORY EVALUATION OF EDIBLE DAYLILLIES (HEMEROCALLIS)
Authors
Pollard, Ashley - MSU
Coggins, Patti - MSU
Coker, Christine - MSU
Fain, Glenn
Knight, Patricia - MSU
Submitted to: Meeting Abstract Publication Type: Abstract Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2004 Publication Date: October 7, 2004 Citation: Pollard, A., Coggins, P., Coker, C.H., Fain, G.B., Knight, P.R. 2004. Sensory evaluation of edible daylillies (hemerocallis). Meeting Abstract, pg.15.
Technical Abstract: All parts of the daylily (Hemerocallis sp.) are edible. Flowers can be chopped into green salads, eaten as a garnish, or deep-fried. Objectives of this project were to determine if daylily flower color or cultivar influences taste. Twenty-five daylily cultivars were established in blocks of 25 plants per cultivar in a field planting at the South Mississippi Branch Experiment Station (USDA Zone 8b) during the summer of 2002. No chemicals were applied. Multiple blooms from 15 daylily cultivars were harvested during the early morning on June 19, 2003. These 15 cultivars had sufficient flowers for sampling. Flowers were transported to Starkville, MS in a cooler where they were evaluated the same day at the Garrison Sensory Evaluation Laboratory. Each panelist received 15 different daylily blooms on separate coded plates and water to rinse between each sample. Panelists were instructed to rank the lilies from most to least preferred and provide additional comments. 'Rosie Meyer', a red flower, was the most preferred daylily. Panelist comments included the following: vegetable-like, peppery light mild, sweet, slight peach flavor, and celery-like. 'Lavender Doll', 'Joan Senior', and 'Aztec Gold' were ranked in the next tier and were 2nd, 3rd, and 4th, respectively. Comments about 'Lavender Doll', a lavender flower, included the following: most salad-like, tastes like a fig, good, pepper, earthy. Comments about ' Joan Senior', a cream flower, consisted of the flower being sweet, velvety, slight throat burn, bland, or grassy. 'Aztec Gold', a gold flower, reportedly tasted mild with a lettuce note, was crunchy, slick, bland, plain, slightly earthy, or burned. 'Bonanza' and 'Border Baby' ranked 14th and 15th, respectively. Panelists reported that 'Bonanza', a gold flower, had a throat burn, was bitter, had a bad off flavor, or was like dirty lettuce. Panelists felt that 'Border Baby', a yellow flower, tasted velvety, green, lettuce-like, bitter or was slick to the tongue. It appears that daylily taste is related to cultivar more than flower color. 'Rosie Meyer', a red lily, was most preferred. However, another red lily, 'Along the Way', ranked much lower. Two yellow lilies, 'Border Baby' and 'Bonanza' were rated lowest, but another yellow lily, 'Aztec Gold', rated much higher. Overall, panelists were pleased with the taste of daylilies in general. Food professionals are very interested in working with daylilies as both a garnish and ingredient. It appears that daylilies may be a viable niche edible crop for ornamental producers.
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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Yes, my Italian grandmother used to make them as well as zucchini flowers. She'd make a light batter and deep fry them in olive oil. I wish I paid more attention to her cooking.
wrote:

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Sweet potato leaves can be used like spinach.
Ah what to grow and eat and NOT EAT ?
Bill
<http://www.pfaf.org/leaflets/ediborn.php
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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Bill said:

seq_no_11
or

Salads at our house reach their heights when the daylilies are in bloom. The bulk of the ones we eat are the common orange ones that the neighbor planted along the fence line, but my salad favorites are a couple of the fancy ones I grow: a large, deep gold, nicely scented hybrid (I think it may be 'Mary Todd') and a huge, bright red one called 'Baja.'
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
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On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 13:05:20 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Is it a pale yellow? I guess I can just go look it up. I have heard of it before.
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wrote:

It's a perfect lemon-skin yellow. http://www.oakesdaylilies.com/supplier/product.php?id=s000&pid=S000_1603&browse=1
Cheap, too. Not a fancy new improved latest greatest get it before your friends have it type. :-)
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joe, are you pleased with the service from this site?
http://www.oakesdaylilies.com
wrote:

http://www.oakesdaylilies.com/supplier/product.php?id=s000&pid=S000_1603&browse=1
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Yeah - they were terrific. The product arrived in great condition. Unfortunately, I didn't plant them fast enough, which I'm sure hobbled the plants to some extent.
Now, if I only had the cash to pay my neighbors to not call the cops when I blow away the deer that munch the blossoms.....but that's another issue.
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On 3/26/08 9:05 AM, in article HSrGj.604$ snipped-for-privacy@news02.roc.ny,

And it smells so good!
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On 3/26/08 8:43 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

Any time

No room to store it over the winter. Maybe the laying tool.... C
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wrote:

I'd wait until fall to divide and transplant them.
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Jangchub wrote:

Some MAY bloom this year but it usually is the second season before transplanted Day Lilies bloom. When you dig them up make sure that you get most of the root. NOW is an excellent time of year to transplant them.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

Gardening for over 40 years
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wrote:

On old doctor here in town once told me that you can transplant anything at anytime if you dig a large enough ball of soil with it.
I've found this to be true in nearly all cases...daylillies, shrubs, daffodils, iris, tomatoes, trees......I try and get enough soil that few roots are disturbed, though sometimes I need help moving such a large ball of soil.
Care Charlie
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Yup!
I'd add that if you cut the top growth back a smaller ball may prosper. Some sort of balance I guess is the issue. Bamboo which has a root system from here to china seems to be happy with just roots and a growth to make us humans think we know what we are doing.
Bill who sometimes just rips things up and layer it sideways and might just stick it in the ground.
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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They're such hardy buggers there's no reason not to do it now but chances are they'll be pretty shocked with spring already this well along, and won't bloom until the summer after this. However there are so many cultivars, lots of the almost rampant and bloom even if you try to kill them, while others are a little sensitive and would rather be divided after they calm down late summer or early autumn. Either way -- leaving them too big a clump, or shocking them now that they've woken from winter -- won't result in a good solid bloom until the summer after this one.
I had only three kinds and liked them but they all spread more crazily than I expected and don't bloom so well after they're very dense with root and a huge clump. So when it was time to divide them I dug 'em up and gave them away, as I just don't like having to dig stuff up as often as every year. Two of them came back even after I got rid of them!
I've taken a greater fancy to various kinds of turks-cap lilies, from giant doubles eight feet tall and so many petals per bloom they look like a knotted ball of brightly colored rope, or little locally native midgets a foot tall or so with tiny turks-caps. The blooms last lots longer, and you can skip digging them up for years though eventually they'll get too densely packed in one place.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
visit my temperate gardening website:
http://www.paghat.com.html
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