daffodill bulbs

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Interesting tat no where in this advertisement for a food product do they tell you what the ingredients are. One can only guess:
enriched flour
soy oil
high fructose corn syrup
(Other corn products, Food Additives That May Contain Corn: Calcium lactate or stearate Calcium stearoyl lactylate Dextrin or Dextrose Ethyl maltol Fumaric or Lactic acid Gluconolactone or Glucono delta-lactone Glucose Glycerine Hydrolyzed vegetable protein Lecithin Linoleic acid Malt, Maltodextrin, Maltose or Maltol Mannitol Polydextrose Polysorbates Potassium gluconate Propylene glycol monostearate Sodium ascorbate or other ascorbates Sodium stearoyl fumarate Sodium-, Magnesium-, Calcium- or Potassium-fumarate Stearyl citrate Tocopherol (alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin E) Reference: Farlow, C. Food Additives: A Shoppers Guide to Whats Safe and Whats Not. 1993. )
salt
artificial flavor
artificial color
and enough BHA or BHT for a twenty year shelf life. -------
Just a guess mind you;-)
--

Billy


http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=7WBB0svwMdY&feature=related

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Sigh.......no, they look really tasty. Long way from Pittsburgh to Sticksville.

Dyno was used for fishing too. You could really stock up when one of the uncles stickfished. I remember the really oldtimers talking about filling up a wagon, horsedrawn, with fish and the whole community went to work.
I well remember us taking our longuns to school so that we didn't have to waste time going home before hunting. Only two restrictions, you had to keep them in your locker, and they had to be unloaded, on the bus and at school. Taking them out and showing them was okiedokie. We even had the principal and/or superintendant and teachers come out and check out a new piece.
Crikey, Bill, it's a Brave New World
Charlie, winamp Peter Seiler,Cosmic Strings Vol.1,1994
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In article

Oh, come on. Nobody grew up with the Nelsons. They had separate twin beds. The Nelsons was when ignorance was bliss.
--

Billy


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Hope you got down on "Earth Day". Down on your knees works for me to:-(
--

Billy


http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=7WBB0svwMdY&feature=related

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On 4/22/2008 3:44 PM, Eggs Zachtly wrote:

In my garden, the narcissus foliage (both daffodils and their relatives) remains green and vigorous for well more than a month after the flowers have withered and faded. The leaves are still working, manufacturing nutrients to rebuild the bulb. For this, they still need moisture as well as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and other plant nutrients from the soil -- through the roots.
Only after the leaves start to yellow are the roots no longer important. Digging the bulbs before then might leave bulbs that flower the next year. But repeating this again in that next year might prevent the bulbs from flowering a third year.
Sometimes, I do dig and divide the bulbs in my garden. I do this when the foliage is not yellow but brown and dried. I immediately (same day) replant the bulbs that I'm keeping. I have no interruption of blooming with this practice.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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David E. Ross said:

That's exactly what I said.
[rest snipped]
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Eggs

-For every action, there is an equal and opposite government program.
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On 23/4/08 10:16, in article 1e6ian5scx3lv$. snipped-for-privacy@sneupie.eingang.org, "Eggs
<snip>

Perhaps you could snip a bit more next time? Repeating such a lot just to add one line is a bit of a waste of space.
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Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
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AFTER the foliage dies back you can do that.
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<Grouchy.Oldgit wrote

I planted some on my Mums grave near the S. coast years ago and they come up year on year, I also planted some "Glory of the Snow" and after the first clump got stolen they grew well but the over enthusiastic early strimming of the grave by the workmen saw to them. They could see and miss the Daff leaves but not those of the little bulbs. No point in planting summer stuff due to the strimming.
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Regards
Bob Hobden
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If you don't dig them up, make sure to cut off the flower heads once they start to wither. This encourages them to put their strength into the bulb. If you leave the flowers they put their strength into setting seed.
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On 21/4/08 00:09, in article snipped-for-privacy@x41g2000hsb.googlegroups.com,

Providing nobody mows over the grave and cuts off the leaves, let the bulbs remain in place. You can remove the faded flowers but whatever you do, leave the leaves in place as these will nourish the bulb for next year's flowering. Daffodils flower again and again every year and they increase naturally, creating offsets little bulbs that eventually turn into big grown up bulbs that produce more flowers. Think Wordsworth. There are summer bedding plants you can use, of course but there are also some summer flowering bulbs which can also remain in place.
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Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
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On Apr 20, 7:09�pm, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

Daffodils are very hardy and resiliant... unless you're going to enter a daff contest for best of show there's no need to do anything and they will continue to thrive and produce more and more year after year... even if you mow them before the flowers fade once established they will do just fine. You need to concern yourself more with critters ravaging daffs, deer and rabbits won't eat them but squirrels and chipmonks love them... still most will live on.
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On Apr 20, 7:09pm, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

Seems to me that after you plant daffodills, it's quite difficult to kill them if you try.
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