Curing sweet potatoes?

This year we planted sweet potatoes in our garden in SE Iowa. Had a bit of frost a couple of nights ago so I dug them today and Googled on how to store them. To my surprise they need to be cured before storing.
Most of the instructions that I found said that they should first be kept in an area of 80 to 90 degrees F with approximately 80 to 90 percent humidity for 7 to 10 days. I can no doubt use a small half bath in our shop for the area and I could keep it at 80 to 90 degrees F with a small space heater but the humidity would be only around 55 percent. OTOH, I could put a small humidifier in the area and no space heater to get the humidity up to around 85 percent but the temperature would only be around 65 degrees F.
I definitely do NOT want to put both the space heater and the humidifier in this small 4' by 6' area at the same time so which is more important heat or humidity?
Maybe the space heater and a bucket of water????
Thanks for reading my looooong first post.
Don
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On Wednesday, October 8, 2014 12:23:33 AM UTC-4, IGot2P wrote:

They will cure just fine at a lower temperature for a longer time. Pile them where they were dug and throw a tarp over them, weight the edges and leave them for a couple of weeks. Bake one and try it, should be sweet and delicious. HTH, Steve (who needs to dig his sweet potatos)
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On 10/8/2014 11:00 AM, Steve Peek wrote:

Steve, thanks for your response, it was appreciated and reassuring that the planting, weeding, and digging was not a wastes of time and effort. Everything that I had read basically stated that if I didn't do exactly as they suggested that I just as well toss them out.
Late last night I did put a small space heater (turned on low) and a bucket of water in the small area that I mentioned. I just checked it and the temperature is 85 degrees F and the humidity is 65%. Not exactly what they suggested but after your response I think that it is close enough.
Don
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On Wednesday, October 8, 2014 3:01:48 PM UTC-4, IGot2P wrote:

SE Iowa is pretty far north for sweet potatoes, did you make a decent crop?
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On 10/8/2014 3:43 PM, Steve Peek wrote:

I think it was a really decent crop but what do I know, it was the first time I ever planted them. 12 plants in a 24' row produced a heaping 5 gallon bucket.
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On Wednesday, October 8, 2014 5:36:25 PM UTC-4, IGot2P wrote:

Very nice! Even though I live in the #1 sweet potato state it took years for me to learn to grow them (before the internet). Two years ago I had one that weighed just under 9 pounds.
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On 10/10/2014 2:59 AM, Steve Peek wrote:

for me to learn to grow them (before the internet).
So what is the secret to growing them for an abundant yield?
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On Friday, October 10, 2014 12:50:36 AM UTC-4, Fran Farmer wrote:

I have rows of about 30 feet in my garden. I apply chicken manure the lengt h of the row and then rake from both sides into a hill of about 12 inches i n height. I then apply Gardentone (an organic fertilizer) to the length of the hill. I then plant the "slips" about 12 inches apart and water well. Wh en the vines begin to run go through weekly and lift them back to the origi nal slip. This puts all the plants' energy into the original roots creating large potatoes. If this lifting is not done the vines will attempt to root at every leaf creating dozens of small thin potatoes.
When I first started trying to grow them that 30' row would produce over a bushel of tiny finger sized potatoes. Following my current method I now get about 2 bushels of 6 oz. - 2+pound potatoes.
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On 11/10/2014 2:49 AM, Steve Peek wrote:

Thank you Steve. Were a bit marginal here for the growing of sweet potatoes, but I've tired for the past couple of years and not had much to show for my efforts. I'll try again this year and try your method and hope the frost stays away for long enough to get a harvest.
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On Friday, October 17, 2014 11:24:50 PM UTC-4, Fran Farmer wrote:

ar

ength of the row and then rake from both sides into a hill of about 12 inch es in height. I then apply Gardentone (an organic fertilizer) to the length of the hill. I then plant the "slips" about 12 inches apart and water well . When the vines begin to run go through weekly and lift them back to the o riginal slip. This puts all the plants' energy into the original roots crea ting large potatoes. If this lifting is not done the vines will attempt to root at every leaf creating dozens of small thin potatoes.

r a bushel of tiny finger sized potatoes. Following my current method I now get about 2 bushels of 6 oz. - 2+pound potatoes.

If you have some indoor growing space you might try producing your own slip s. In mid to late winter take sweet potatoes and lay on their side covering about 1/2 way with growing medium. Keep the medium warm and moist and prov ide bright light. The potatoes will send out running vines. Each leaf can p roduce a "slip" at the junction between the leaf and the vine. I usually cl ip the runners at 18 inches or so leaving one leaf with the potato. Section the runner cutting just past the leaves so that you have a piece of vine t opped with one leaf. Dip the vine end in rooting hormone (or not) and plant in small pots again providing moisture and light. They will start to grow another vine when they are rooted. Plant them as I noted above when ALL dan ger of frost has passed. Luck to you, Steve
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