Crepe Myrtle question

Hi all -- When I bought my house last year, the landscaper that did the initial work on the property planted three crepe myrtles that are now about 4.5 feet tall. One of them has bloomed three times since planting, but the others have never even set buds. I don't know what the particular cultivars are, I just know that they're supposed to be tree-sized eventually (10-15 feet tall) and each is supposed to have blooms of a different color (the one that's blooming now is deep plum/pink and the other two are supposed to be white and purple). Can anyone think of a reason why two of these three similarly situated crepe myrtles haven't bloomed yet? Are there particular cultivars that don't bloom until later in their growth cycle? Thanks in advance for any info.
Rhonda Richmond, VA USDA Zone 7
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Natty Dread wrote:

Is the soil of the same quality for each tree? They might need fertilizer. It could also be transplant shock or something.
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Hi all -- When I bought my house last year, the landscaper that did the initial work on the property planted three crepe myrtles that are now about 4.5 feet tall. One of them has bloomed three times since planting, but the others have never even set buds. I don't know what the particular cultivars are, I just know that they're supposed to be tree-sized eventually (10-15 feet tall) and each is supposed to have blooms of a different color (the one that's blooming now is deep plum/pink and the other two are supposed to be white and purple). Can anyone think of a reason why two of these three similarly situated crepe myrtles haven't bloomed yet? Are there particular cultivars that don't bloom until later in their growth cycle? Thanks in advance for any info.
Rhonda Richmond, VA USDA Zone 7
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It might take some patience. Also, fertilize the trees in the fall-winter. Tree spikes work well; don't overdo it. Plants need a certain amount (hours per day) of bright-light or sun to bloom.
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They might have trouble with less that 6-8 hours of sun per day. They might have been pruned in late spring/early summer. I wouldn't worry with such small trees the first year. Prune in autumn till early spring if they need it and enjoy your blooms next summer!
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elizabeth, Baton Rouge, LA
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Crape myrtles bloom on new growth. Shape them in very early spring (February here where I am in S.C. Texas) and never prune them before the cold weather is looming. This will promote new growth and if you get a cold snap those tips will burn back.
Crape myrtle is not ordinarily a heavy feeder, but you can give them a nice fertilization in spring by using a quality, certified organic fertilizer and top dress with quality compost.
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