Crab Spiders

They're so cute, these crab spiders. For three days in a row I've been watching a white one that lives in white thimbleberry flower. Today her blossom-house is all wilted, & no more prey is apt to come to her there. There are fresh thimbleberry flowers right next to her flower-house, but she hasn't yet figured out she should move next door. Couple days ago she caught a really big pollinating fly, & held onto it for two days in her big pinchers, & yesterday I was lucky enough to see her carry the husk to the edge of her house & throw it away.
Crab spiders or flower-spiders take two or three days to turn the same color as the flower they lurk in, so pollinators can't see them. They don't make webs. I remember my great-grampa's cornrows of dahlias had bright blue & bright orange & bright red crab spiders waiting in the blooms to ambush pollinators. But the most common ones can turn only shades from white to yellow, & if you put one in a flower the color of which they can't match, they leave to find a white or yellow flower.
When lurking in flowers & being color-coordinated, I find them so attractive & appealing. Not all crab spiders ambush from flowers, though, & sometimes a particularly big one that lives on the ground, running sideways with its front pincers raised above its head, scares the bejabbers out of me. They have great eye-sight & wave their pinchers threateningly, which is kind of weird, tiny little thing threatening to do me in if I don't go away. But the flower spiders are always quite small & pretty & sit perfectly still waiting for prey, they seem pretty sure they're invisible & never act threatened even while being watched.
This morning when I saw this one's house had wilted, I touched the outside of a wilted petal, & the ivory white spider ran to the front of the flower to see if there was something to catch. I almost took it out of the wilted flower to put in a fresh one, but I suppose it'll soon enough figure that out without my help.
I tried to get a picture of it:
http://www.paghat.com/images/thimbleberryspider_june.jpg
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-Message snipped-

But it works, doesn't it?! :-) Jacqueline
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lovely descriptions, you're planning to write a book, right?
I had a big yellow and black garden spider come in to me kitchen last september. She set herself at the top of my window and laid a little nest of eggs.
I thought she'd be gone in a few weeks, but no, she lasted until late March. I fed her flies if I could find them (which was quite difficult in the winter). As we have the kind of house that often has forgotten fruit around it, there were fruit flies, and I could sometimes catch them with my tweezers and insert them into her web (which she liked: she would snatch them and eat them).
Anyway, she died about three weeks ago, but her little egg basket is still there in my window, so I expect I'll have hundreds of little garden spiders everywhere within a few weeks.
Bless her little cotton socks.
This is a true story.
s.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.