coyotes disappearing?

I haven't heard any coyotes since sometime in midwinter here in southwestern New Mexico. Other people are remarking on this too, so I don't think it's usual; does anybody have a plausible explanation? I've heard only one rumor regarding this, that some ranchers have been leaving out food for the coyotes laced with some kind of sterilization drug; and I got that rumor third-hand.
It could just be that this year's babies are still too young to go out hunting, so the mamas are home in the den and only the older males are fetching the food... but would that explain no yelping at all? And the rodent population, especially that of rabbits, seems way larger than usual.
Any insights appreciated -- jc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 17:08:51 -0000, jcomeau_ictx

There haven't been any outbreaks of mange or distemper reported have there? Our fox population was decimated years ago by this. Has recovered some.
From:
http://www.ngpc.state.ne.us/wildlife/coyote.asp
"Sarcoptic mange occurs in coyote populations throughout Nebraska. Mange outbreaks occasionally become severe and can seriously reduce coyote populations over large areas for a number of years. Other important diseases and parasites that effect coyotes include canine distemper, canine hepatitis and heartworm. Surprisingly, rabies is not an important disease in coyotes, although they are susceptible to that disease."
Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
they all packed up and moved to new jersey. they are trying to eat our babies. i cant say i blame them.
jcomeau_ictx wrote:

--
Message posted via HomeKB.com
http://www.homekb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/gardens/200706/1
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Animals cycle. If you don't have many coyotes this year, you'll have a lot of other animals, ie: rabbits, etc. Next year you will have a lot of whatever feeds on the animals that didn't have enough natural predators this year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Understood. I'd like to get some idea what caused the downtrend this year. There just aren't any other predators I know of which could take the coyote's place in the local ecosystem, especially with regard to rabbits. Until my crossbow skills improve, I'm afraid the jackrabbits and cottontails are just going to proliferate until every green thing is turned into pellets.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 23:50:54 -0000, jcomeau_ictx

May I suggest an alternative to your crossbow? Gets good results for me.
Air Rifle...with scope if desired. I've a .177 Gamo. Muzzle velocity of 1200 fps, rifled barrel, quiet, extremely accurate, and great for rabbits the cat can't handle. Cheap to shoot. Safe in areas that require extra caution.
Air rifles are used extensively in Europe for hunting and pest control.
Kinda pricey, but we're not talkin' Daisy here. These are real tools.
http://www.gamousa.com /
Good Hunting Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie expounded:

Will they handle a groundhog or two? ;->
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldn't recommend. Woodchucks are pretty big and thick.
Woodcharlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Prey and predator cycles are interrelated. We get a big boom of bunnies every seven years here in Alaska. Bunnies boom, then the predators boom. Then they all crap out while populations rebuild.
Coyotes and wolves will control the number of pups born in a particular year, depending on the level of their food source.
If the food source (protein base) is really low, the alpha bitch in a wolf pack may only have two pups. In a fat year, she'll have a half dozen or more.
Everything is connected to everything else. Pull on one thread and you pull on the whole system.
Jan in Alaska beef cattle rancher
PS: The only predators on our ranch that kill our calves are the neighbor gal's dogs. The wolves, coyotes, black bears, brown bears and various raptors & corvids (except for magpies) don't bother our calves. We keep a .25-06 hanging in the barn for dogs.
Ah, since this is the gardening group, my brassicas are enjoying our hot weather. It was 78F. here yesterday. Insufferably hot. We're hoping for better weather soon. And a little rain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

? Here in costal northern California the sheep ranchers leave out poison. I guess that is a form of birth control.
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
--
Billy
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.