Count them Six Datura Blooms


I grew this from a cutting last fall and left it in a basement window over the winter in a 6" Pot. It has only been fertilized twice. The mother plant, also in the basement but planted in the ground has only had one bloom all summer.
I wonder if it's the 12" pot? I read once that Oak trees in years of drought will produce more acorn than normal. Something about being programmed to reproduce themselves when under stress. (Eastern Ontario)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/Treacan/Garden/Datura002.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/Treacan/Garden/Datura001.jpg
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Well it's a nice plant but it's not a Datura it's a Brugmansia which is a close relative. As soon as you said cutting you pretty much eliminated Datura even before the photo had a chance to load. I don't recall is day length is a factor in blooming on this plant but I wouldn't bet against it.
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I thougt that Brugmansia and Datura was the same. The plant gets sun from 10 to about 4.
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On 23 Aug 2005 19:35:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com wrote:

Night temperatures are what determine the flowering of all nightshades and this is a nightshade or solanacea family.
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wrote:

I have two. One looks exactly like the one in the picture but is now about 7 feet high and wide. It started out about haft that size of the one in the picture and only got a few blooms late in the first season - after I brought it inside for the winter. The next year it got much bigger and started to bloom earlier. This year the thing is absolutely HUGE and has been blooming in cycles most of the summer. It seems to do better with cooler nights, but has been blooming even when night temperature were in the high 70s. One thing for sure is that they demand lots of fertilizer and lots of water. I can hardly keep up with both. When they bloom I can smell them all over the yard.
I had some breakage due to high winds and then I had to prune one of them because it was too big for my deck. I cut the branches into pieces and put them in a bucket of water. One rooted and then I planted it in soil. It lost all of its leaves, but is now putting out new leaves. I have one more the put out a large number of roots at a node near the surface of the water. About 18 inches of bare stem is below the water. Should I cut the stem off just below the roots and pot it or should I include part of the bare stem that is below the roots?
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I think what you have is a brugmansia although they were once classified as a datura. I have both and there is a difference. The blossoms on your plant are beautiful. My biggest complaint about the brug in our area is that it is pest magnet, which means everything from spider mites to caterpillars.
Check out this site, which explains the difference:
http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/brug/2002104154005861.html
John
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