Composters: Soilmaker or Biostack

20 years ago, I bought one of your typical square plastic composters with a lid. The ex-wife has it, so I need another one just like it. I do NOT want any other kind. In one review of the Soilmaker, the owner said that with enough material in the box, the sides bowed out and made it hard to slide the compost removal doors up & down, and that it also affected whether the lid would fit on again. My old box was thick enough that this never happened, and perhaps this particular writer made his compost too wet (& heavy).
As far the the Biostack, I wonder about the fact that the box is built with a tiered design. Not convinced I want something that's already in too many pieces.
I'd appreciate opinions from people who own either of these two brands. Not "types", but THESE SPECIFIC BRANDS.
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In my personal experience and as reviewed by Consumerreports.org, The Smith & Hawken Biostack, is clearly the best home composter of this type
"Compost bins: The best cost less
WASTE NOT The Smith & Hawken Biostack is easy to use. Some of the newest compost bins promise to do their work in just a few weeks and with minimal fuss. That's wishful thinking, judging by our tests.
Slow decay. In our test of composting conditions, we found that it took 8 to 10 weeks to see fine, dark material that resembles compost. In nine weeks, the low-rated Tumbleweed turned leaves and grass clippings into large, odorous clumps.
Chemical analysis of some 21-week-old material showed that it hadn't fully decomposed. It contained levels of ammonia that can stunt sensitive seedlings and potted house plants.
Even when compost looks ready, we found that it often needs at least eight to nine weeks more to be safe for all garden uses. One way to know when compost is ready: Put a small amount in a pot with radish seeds. If the seeds germinate and grow, the compost is mature.
Pitching in. Composting works best if you turn the pile occasionally, typically using a pitchfork to break up clumps. The barrel-shaped Tumbleweed and Gardener's Supply are designed to turn or roll. The idea is good in theory. In practice, when they were full of composting material or soaked by rain, turning them was a struggle. Clumps never broke up.
In convenience, the top-rated Biostack was the best. Its interlocking plastic planks can be stacked or removed to change the size of the bin or to make it easier to shovel out compost.
Design drawbacks. The expensive Gardener's Supply didn't drain well. Its compost became soggy--creating odors and inviting insects. The Tumbleweed can be messy; liquid can spill on you when you turn it.
The bottom line. The Smith & Hawken Biostack, $90, is the best choice: easy to use and moderately priced. We've judged it a CR Best Buy. The Scepter Corp. GardenGourmet, $80, is also worth considering.
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 16:43:11 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

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I read that review. S&H won't have them until December. Does anyone remember when they used to be an actual gardening company, instead of an outlet for mostly useless made-in-China ornaments? :-)
I'll be searching online for other sources for that composter. Do you find it's rigid enough to not twist, so the top won't fit?
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