Compost Tea; Insulated container; Aquarium airpump.. ?

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from snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (paghat) contains these words:
There is debate in England right

Please provide a cite for this "English" debate, a search for "compost tea" on the PSD website produced no results.
Janet (UK)
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This was, for example, a major topic at the British Grassland Society's Organic Farming Conference in 2004, where vendor-oriented propogandists & their hired "scientists" were set-upon by actual researchers concerned about the human pathogenic threat posed by compost teas. Because academics & serious researchers frequently work in a "publish or perish" environment, the world wide web is not their first choice of "publication." Vendor propoganda on the other hand is going to appear primarily on the web because it would be laughed out of scientific publication & the web is more "democratic" when it comes to falsehoods & exaggerations promulgated by vendors & their flunkies like our own beloved Tom or the eerie Mr Diver now in our ng promoting exclusively vendor falsehoods without even slight regard for authentic data.
The web can be great for Insta-Info or superficial double-checks in a hurry for topics more political than scientific. If you've read an actual book or some articles about something, it's hard to remember all that verbatim, & googling can provide reminders. But if the web is to be one's first & only source of information, one will end up more often MISinformed, & not deeply knowledgeable about anything a-tall.
Plus any Web search for "compost tea" in particular will not usually get you even abstracts of serious research since it isn't a precise or scientific term & not all academics coopt that term, preferring an array of terms, most commonly "Compost Extract(s)" but also an array of terms that define the type or method of obtaining compost extracts.
So if you require only a web citation you'll have to look for it yourself, there's probably something about it somewhere but you'll be weeding through masses of sales pitches & propoganda to find your way to one paragraph of fact. But if you will settle for something far better, here's a precise quote in answer to your specific request:
"Further work is required to ensure that the production and use of compost teas and extracts can be guaranteed not to propagate and spread human pathogens onto food intended for human consumption. There is continuing debate over whether compost extracts and teas require to be registered with the pesticide authorities, e.g., The Pesticides Safety Directorate in the UK" [Litterick et al "Role of Uncomposted Materials, Composts, Manures, & Compost Extracts in Reducing Pest & Disease Incidence & Severity," Critical Review of Plant Sciences, 2004]. This was also quoted very close to verbatim without being credited as to author, in an official government document under the sub-heading "1.2 Pesticide regulations relating to the use of compost teas/extracts" in a web document you CAN find at the UK Department of Environment Food & Rural Affairs website; the government document version begins "At present, the main potential problem with compost teas appears to be the concern that fermenting compost could potentially support the growth of human pathogens."
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On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 18:03:59 +0100, Janet Baraclough

Jessica's usual know it all hysteria aside it was an issue last year!
Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets. To plant a pine, one need only own a shovel. -- Aldo Leopold
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Drew -
You can refer to this as a plant extract, liquid plant manure, or grass tea.
You can expect to get some soluble nutrients, and maybe some bioactive substances.
How soon is uncertain, since you are doing some new and different based on the unique volumes, ingredients, and aeration scheme you have devised.
Typically plant extracts are made by a simple soaking method that is non-aerated and are allowed to steep for 7-10 days.
In your situation, I think 3-7 days is a range to consider.
There was a farmer in Missouri who obtained a USDA-SARE grant and made farm-scale quantities of grass tea in one of those kiddy swimming pools. He called it green tea extract and used it as a soluble liquid organic fertilizer for his market crops of vegetables and berries on several acres. It was thoroughly documented through lab tests, etc.
He presented his research at the Small Farm Today conference in Jefferson City, MO, last November. He compared the green tea extract with commercial soluble fertilizers. The organic treatment provided a substantial amount of fertility, but was not sufficient as a complete fertilizer "alone". He was pleased with the results. He expressed interest in combining the extraction with a microbial inoculant such as EM (Effective Microorganisms) to faciliate the bioprocess.
Liquid plant manures and plant-based pest control and fermented plant extracts are *very* common in India, Africa, and Asia where poor farmers use local resources instead of purchased inputs.
Good for you to give it a try (though I suggest you might try smaller volumes of grass, and also use other local plants such as clover and garden herbs like comfrey).
Steve Diver Northwest Arkansas, Zone 6b
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Thank you Steve for an answer that applies to the question. I am going to go for 3 days per batch and see what happens. But that "seeing" might not be complete until Spring. drew
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