Compost Heap. Horse Manure. Pathogens.

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I get horse poop & sit it in a composter for 6-12 months cold to break down. My dogs also enjoy a tasty bit of horse dung.
rob
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Dogs really can be such nasty little snots at times.
The other day, I went to visit my neighbour. I give her eggs, she gives me horse poop and we both think we get the best part of the deal.
One of her tenants who rented one of the houses on her farm died and the tenant's Corgi ended up being adopted by my neighbour.
The Corgi was lying on the Persian rug under an old church pew in the entry hall and chewing something with real relish. When we investigated it was a half moon shaped thing which turned out to be a paring from the horse's hoof from when the farrier had shod the horses that morning.
I usually have a cast iron stomach but for some reason seeing the Corgi doing this really turned my stomach.
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Oh but this is really well known. When I had a horse I used to take him off to the farrier every so often and there were always a few dogs hanging about in a hopeful sort of way. The farrier flung the parings out the door and the dogs fell on them as if starving! What it is about dogs eating poo I have no idea but one of mine used to eat fox poo. I think a dog breeder once suggested to me that it was something to do with obtaining iron but I have no idea if this is true.
--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
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Our dogs never used to do it - now you've got me wondering why. Dead kangaroos or anything else dead, then yes, but not hoof parings. And of course when we neuter the male calves, the way to check the number of males is to count the stones thrown onto the grass, so of course the dogs have to be locked up or otherwise the count is thrown out.
I wonder if there is iron in droppings. Interesting thought that. I guess dog's sense of smell must detect soemthing they want/need for their system.
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You don't keep them for eating? Shocking!
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
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Ed wrote:

with contamination with a potent insecticide used to keep flies down. He would not use it on his food crops.
Frank
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I think that may be the bigger problem, it is common in the southern US to use a feed through larvacide that is usually some kind of diflubenzuron compound and some barn managers sprinkle the manure with Golden Malrin which is a carbamate.
Billy might be able to expand on the hazards of these products.
I have horses and goats and don't use these products in an effort to keep the manure clean ; ).
Chickens are the best natural fly control around barns but unfortunately they don't leave any manure to fertilize with.
basilisk
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Let's look at a worst case scenerio.
Vegetable Gardens and Drainage Fields Sometimes the ideal place to put a vegetable garden seems to be over the leach field, raising the question of bacterial and viral contamination from the effluent. Soils vary a great deal in their ability to filter viruses and bacteria. Clay soils work best, eliminating bacteria within a few inches of the drain trenches, but sandy soils may allow bacterial movement for several feet. A properly operating system will not contaminate the soil with disease-causing organisms, but it is very difficult to determine if a field is operating just as it should. If at all possible, use your septic drain field for ornamentals and plant your vegetables elsewhere.
If you must plant vegetables, take the following precautions. Do not plant root crops over drain lines. Leafy vegetables could be contaminated by rain splashing soil onto the plant, so either mulch them to eliminate splashing or don't grow them. Fruiting crops are probably safe; train any vining ones such as cucumbers or tomatoes onto a support so that the fruit is off the ground. Thoroughly wash any produce from the garden before eating it. Do not construct raised beds over the field; they might inhibit evaporation of moisture.
--

- Billy

"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being is
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Worst case scenerio, take 2.
Forgot my cite :o))
http://www.mastergardenproducts.com/gardenerscorner/septic_drain_field_ga rdening.htm
Vegetable Gardens and Drainage Fields Sometimes the ideal place to put a vegetable garden seems to be over the leach field, raising the question of bacterial and viral contamination from the effluent. Soils vary a great deal in their ability to filter viruses and bacteria. Clay soils work best, eliminating bacteria within a few inches of the drain trenches, but sandy soils may allow bacterial movement for several feet. A properly operating system will not contaminate the soil with disease-causing organisms, but it is very difficult to determine if a field is operating just as it should. If at all possible, use your septic drain field for ornamentals and plant your vegetables elsewhere.
If you must plant vegetables, take the following precautions. Do not plant root crops over drain lines. Leafy vegetables could be contaminated by rain splashing soil onto the plant, so either mulch them to eliminate splashing or don't grow them. Fruiting crops are probably safe; train any vining ones such as cucumbers or tomatoes onto a support so that the fruit is off the ground. Thoroughly wash any produce from the garden before eating it. Do not construct raised beds over the field; they might inhibit evaporation of moisture. -----
The moral is, don't use fresh manure on the edible portion of something you may eat in the next three months.
--

- Billy

"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being is
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I'd wonder more about any antibiotics the horses were given, and what effect they'd have on my own soil's beneficial microbes.
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I'm healthy so I use my own munure in the compost pile and have for years. Dav
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www.shanklinmanormews.co.uk

Yes but you're not paranoid.
You are like most of us, ordinary and use our common sense!!
--
Mike

The Royal Naval Electrical Branch Association
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