Compost bin design?

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which appears to be your comment...

pot. kettle. black. lee
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Perhaps there is an issue with terminology, here?
Some people may use, "above ground" to mean one of those rotating contraptions that is suspended above the surface.
While others may use, "above ground" to mean a bin set on the surface, without any bottom, so the stuff has contact.
In the second case, it may be meant as a contrast to digging a pit, and tossing the stuff down to a level that is under the surface level.
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For cheap and cheerful, find 5 pallets and arrange them on edge in the shape of an E. Pitch your working compost from one bin to the next. Such an arrangement lasted me about 10 years before I had to go foraging for pallets again.
For fancier: http://extension.missouri.edu/xplor/agguides/hort/g06957.htm http://extension.missouri.edu/explore/agguides/hort/g06956.htm http://www.montana.edu/wwwpb/pubs/mt9204.html http://counties.cce.cornell.edu/chemung/ publications/building-compost-bins.pdf
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Jim20729 wrote:

When I had a 3/4 acre yard, I just had an open heap that I used for compost, and every once it a while I would climb up in it with a big rototiller to stir it up good.
Bob
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That's a perfectly fine method for composting but not desirous for the typical home gardener as it's not very attractive but also that method attracts all manner of vermin... generally livestock farmers use your "pit" method to compost the large quantities of manure and straw they muck out of the barns and stables.
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Sheldon wrote:

IIRC, the person who started this discussion had an acre. So an open heap should work fine for that. The pile gets hot. Then when it cools off (or too much rain douses it) tear it all down with the rototiller and then pile it back up again with a pitchfork. When you add something nasty to the pile, bury it a little. The only vermin I had a problem with was fire ants.
For a typical home gardener, two small piles right next to each other, enclosed on 3 sides with wood pallets on edge to make an "E" (someone mentioned this a day or two ago) is the best system I've found. When you're just getting it started, make the pile in one side and then every once in a while turn it good by forking the compost over to the other side.
Best regards, Bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

I've found that small piles/heaps don't work very well for the same reason that pallets don't, they don't contain the generated heat very well, in fact hardly at all (that's why my neighbor's turkey wire contraption didn't work). What you describe that you have is a rather large heap, it would be if you need to go at it with a BIG rototiller... no one takes a BIG rototiller and CLIMBS UP into a small pile about a cubic yard... you must have had a small mountain there... too bad as you say you HAD it, would be nice to see a picture, perhaps you do have one, please post it if you do. Really all I'm saying is that your system will work rather well but it's not very aesthetic by many standards. The typical home gardener buys one of the pretty commercially manufactured bins, but unfortunately there are so many designs and most folks just getting into composting haven't a clue as to which. Again, the rotary type (above ground) suck... but they sell because lots of folk are really attracted to things that whirl and spin, especially if they get to crank the handle... they're blooming imbeciles... imagine how many more they'd sell if they made them with blinking colored lights. There are plenty of blooming imbeciles posting to this thread too, I don't believe for a second that they own those composters they talk about, anyone can point to an image on a web site and say that's what I've been using forever, especially after the fact that someone mentioned it's the one they use showed it on the same exact site... they do a lot of lip flapping but they don't show an actual photo of their actual composter on their actual property, so far I think I'm the only one here who's posted a photo of the actual composter on his actual property. Notice how quiet are all those who do actually post photos of what they say they are about, they know... res ipsa loquitur. .
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