coffee grounds?

i was told to surround the base of my clematis with coffee grounds? is that a good thing?
thanks, rosie
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I am not too sure about the needs of clematis but used coffee grounds are very useful in the garden. They make a decent slow release fertiliser, add organic matter to the soil and go ok as a mulch.
rob
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I agree. George.com wrote:

bulk, I'd let them compost before they were added around any plants, clematis or roses. Better to put them in a compost pile or bucket to break down if you're talking bulk. If you're only talking the grounds from the daily coffee at home, you can distribute the grounds everywhere like George suggested. They're good to aerate the soil, add some slight nutrition to the health of the dirt. They're slightly acidic. And it's better for not sending them to the landfill in the weekly garbage.
hope fall is being good to you. My sweet autumn clematis has now finished and has started setting fuzzy seed heads. And the Jackmanii is hopefully forgiving me for the brutal pruning when I tore the rotted grapevine trellis out last fall. I have something way more sturdy and permanent now for it to latch on and slug it out with the porcelain vine. madgardener up on the ridge, back in Fairy Holler, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee. zone 7, Sunset zone 36
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Van Veen Nursery in Portland, Oregon, reported after using coffee grinds from Starbucks Coffee House for about 18 months that they were very satisfied with the results. 1) it helps to aerate their clay soil. 2) slugs don't like to go through. (So you can see they have both mixed in and put on top.) It does help to make the soil more acidic. But it does not replace fertilizer.
They suspect that by making the soil more acidic you are actually helping the uptake of magnesium. This in turn helps iron uptake and that helps to make the plant green. So really you are starting a process not fertilizing. Combine the coffee with horse mature and organic mulch and watch the amount of fertilizer you use decrease dramatically. As for how they apply it, when the plant is dry and just before it rains they sprinkle it on and around. The rain takes it from there. Otherwise they incorporate into the new beds. No exact rate just cover the top and work it in. (Courtesy of Vicki at Van Veen Nursery)
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eh, claims about the nutrient content of coffee grounds varies but from a scan of test results/claims the npk varies around 1-3N/0.5-1P/1-2K. This is consistent with most animal manure. Manure itself is not classified as a fertiliser as it has low nutrient values per weight however it is used by many in gardens and they never touch a high nutrient fertiliser. I would contend that coffee grounds CAN be used as a fertiliser if used on a regular feeding cycle and if the plants are not greedy feeders. It may be alternated with other fertilisers but should not be discounted as being totally inappropriate to use as a fertiliser.
rob
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thanks mad....................it would just be from my coffee pot............ :)
the fall in wisconsin is starting its magic, and all my LOW BUSH CRANBERRY (thanks group) bushes are red and beautiful!

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I have collected them from several coffee houses in town that make coffee with organic beans - in a pinch I will collect from Starbuck's
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My question is , why compost 1st?

I have many flower and garden beds and sprinkle on all of them all
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Its a mould or fungus, or something that occasionly grows on used coffee grounds..
I experience that sometimes when bags are left unopened for a few days and are slightly damp. I have also seen it on grounds on gardens I have top dressed. I suspect this is the mould/fungi/something from the bag, not actually from sitting in the garden.
A poster on some forum, not sure which one now, a few weeks back suggested this mould/fungi/something can be toxic. Another poster poo pooed that idea and accused the guy of being alarmist. I use grounds alot and haven't seen any side effects from my plants.
Hot composting will get rid of any mould/fungi/something on used grounds as the coffee is super heated and then breaks down in to humus.
rob
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that caused it !
I use grounds alot and haven't seen

********* None here either, was hoping that it was just a *whatever* and nothing too toxic, my plants aren't affected by it at all. But it happened with fall squash and I have yet to harvest, so I was a bit concerned :)

Thought so... Thanks, BG
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I don't think it's necessary to compost coffee. I compost a lot that I get (about 15 pounds a day), but put a lot directly in my garden. Who says composting destroys fungi? Fungi is part of the composting process. But why is it necessarily bad? It may be somewhat unsightly, but that does't make it bad.
Bottom line: coffee is great--compost it or put it directly in the garden, or both.
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I agree with you. The point I was making is that my experience with hot composting is that the mould/fungus/whatever that may be on the grounds prior to composting is not there after a nice warm roast. If the poster is concerned about the mould a nice hot compost should take care of it.
rob
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