climbing rose on cedar hedges?

Hi,
Got an idea. The cedar hedges that seperate b/w my neighbor's property are getting too boring. So, I thought about buying climbing rose that will climb onto the cedar hedge to give it some colour. But when I look at the climbing rose bushes, the rose branches are actually quite thick and I wonder whether it will collape the cedar hedges down.
So, is climbing rose on cedar hedge a bad idea?
Thx
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I'd think you'd want a rambler not a climber and it might be pretty interesting in the cedar. Check Paul's Himalayan Musk at Heirloom Roses: http://heirloomroses.com/cgi/browse.cgi?page=item&cat &item&4
I have one growing into a tree in my yard - blooming now, and is spectacular draping down from the high branches.
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On Fri, 28 May 2004 14:32:35 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@freenet.carleton.ca (Alex Ng) wrote:

Rose canes do not grab onto anything and "climb." To grow well, most roses need a lot of maintenance and lots of sun. Honey suckle might be a better idea, but personally I can't see the improvement of a cedar hedge.
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I'm not sure what zone Alex Ng is in, but in the south, Cherokee Rose would grow 75 feet or more up into pine trees etc. Pretty white blossoms in spring - but only one bloom time. Devlish thorns however. In spite of its name, it's a native of China, escaped into the wilds in the southeast.
(Alex

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Provided it gets enough sun and does not compete with the cedars' roots for water and nutrients, I think it's a great idea. HT climbers are fussy plants, so you might want to consider an older rose culitivar or a species. One of the best rose combinations I've seen was a Rosa glauca growing into and up a Lawson cypress. The blue-gray with reddish tones of the rose's foliage were a great contrast against the deep blue green of the cypress. This species also offers smallish, single magenta flowers in late spring (sinlge bloom time, tho) and bright orange fall hips. This is a very durable, hardy and disease-free rose species and not overly rampant in its growth habit.
pam - gardengal
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On Fri, 28 May 2004 14:32:35 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@freenet.carleton.ca (Alex Ng) wrote:

I'd think they'd be too heavy and at least mash and deform the foliage on the hedges, and since they don't really have any means of attaching themselves, they'd get blown down in wind, and just pull themselves down from their own weight and would prove stickery whenever anyone had to do any kind of maintenance with either the roses or hedge.
Try clematis .. they're kind of intended for scrambling on/through hedges. and there are all kinds of clematis you could acquire, start them through cuttings from friends, or buy a new one or more each year to have a wild display all year long and you'd have new blooms to anticipate every year ;-)
Janice
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