Clematis question

Ok, so my equal half bought a Clematis plant the other day on sale (her excuse), and now we want to know when to transplant it outdoors - before or after our last Spring frost? We live in zone 6 in the wilds of Washington State.
Thanks, Bill
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Depends on what the clematis looks like now. If it was purchased bare root - in box with a plastic bag around the roots filled with peat - it should planted in a pot for a season before planting it directly into the ground. If any green top growth is visible, this will need to be protected from frosts until it is able to harden off. Keep in a cool location - not room temperature - with bright, indirect light until it is safe to put outside.
If it was last season's vine from a nursery, it is still dormant and can be planted outside as soon as your ground is workable. In the warmer half of WA state, that is now.
pam - gardengal
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Thanks so much for your valuable information, Pam! My equal half sends you a big hug!
Regards, Bill

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Also, FYI, it's better to purchase a 1 year old Clematis vs. one of those bare root Wal Mart ones.
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Bare root clematis ARE at least one year old.
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I planted some small clematis outside. Some had twining stems w/ leaves, some were bare root. DO you think they survived our rather tough winter here in zone 6b long island?? Thanks Pam. Love Caryn "Come into my garden, my flowers want to meet you!"
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In article snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

Is this also true for the raspberry and blueberry plants they sell at Menards. Those too are in a box with a plastic bag around the roots filled with peat. I got suckered by Menards and bought a couple, planted them outside, and they all died.
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says...

Depends on their size. Many bare root plants can be planted directly into the ground from the box or bag and should do well. If they are tiny, I'd pot them up for a season. IME, most bare root berry plants are large enough to be directly planted out. Their failure may be due to improper care and storage by the supplier, which is always a risk with discount bare root stock
pam - gardengal
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On Fri, 05 Mar 2004 08:43:56 -0800, Bill Litchfield wrote:

Having worked in a nursery last summer, our clematis looked quite feeble since they were new plants. The advice was to put them in the ground about 3" deeper than their potted soil depth.
I bought clematis several years ago via mail order. They are growing like weeds. Clematis like cool roots and sunshine on the leaves. You can create shade for the roots by planting other things around the clematis.
Fear not, it is only a plant. If it doesn't like its new digs, get another.
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