Chinese Pistachio

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I'm thinking about putting a Chinese Pistachio tree in my back yard but haven't found any information on it's root system. I would like to know how it is with surface roots. Just got rid of some Sweet Gums and don't care to do that again. RM~
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They are pretty, but very prolific, like a silk tree. They can quickly become a real pest.
Kate
: I'm thinking about putting a Chinese Pistachio tree in my back yard but : haven't found any information on it's root system. I would like to know how : it is with surface roots. Just got rid of some Sweet Gums and don't care to : do that again. RM~ : :
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What does this mean? Prolific at what and how does it become a pest? They don't produce any nuts, and they are grown all over the place in Texas with little to no invasiveness. I'm just curious what you mean by prolific and real pest.
Victoria
On Sun, 03 Jul 2005 10:39:28 GMT, "SVTKate"

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Do the roots stay pretty well below the surface??
I would assume that prolific means that they hatch a lot of little ones. They can't be any worse than a Mimosa that a neighbor two doors down has, we just mow em down as they pop up. It's them dadgum above ground roots that irritate me. RM ~
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wrote:

I've never seen one with surface roots, but that's not a scientific answer. As for hatching little ones, they don't produce anything, so nothing to hatch. There are no nuts, or nutlets or seeds or discernable flowers. They are fast growing. I bought a slip about 3 years ago and it's over 15 feet tall.
Victoria
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wrote:

That's what I'm looking for. AEP just came through and took out a 30+ ft red oak and we need some fairly quick shade for the wife's Hosta's. Thanks, Rob Mills ~ Tulsa
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wrote:

Oh, this tree doesn't give a large swath of shade at first. It can take up to 10 years for it to have a nice canopy. Where do you live?
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I'm in N.E. Oklahoma (yep, it's hot) but the spot we are concerned with gets some evening shade about 2:00 PM and the neighbors trees give it some early morning shade. I'm planning to have a credible nursery deliver me a big tree, they will plant it and guarantee it. RM ~
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wrote:

It's not the heat I'm concerned about, it's the cold. I don't know how cold hardy they are. They survive nicely up north in Dallas, so I believe you are a full zone north of that. Keep it watered very well and no matter what they say, you want them to remove the "burlap" and all signs of any wire. If it's containerized, they tree should be well hydrated IN the container before it is planted...especially at this time of year. I know they guarantee it, but it would suck if you lose a tree which is shading hostas during high summer. V
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6, northern AR. It's already about 12' tall and has showed no sign of winter damage. Before we purchased it to replace a huge oak that died, we did quite a bit of research and found that it will do well through zone 5. The suggestion was made to purchase the tree after frost in the fall to determine fall leaf color, which varies from yellow through bright red and all the shades between..
It is remarkably disease and insect free although it is susceptible to Texas root rot.
JPS
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If they can make it over there it can surely make it here. Before I retired I drove an 18 wheeler for Sears, used to run from Tulsa to NW Ark and SW Missouri 5 nights a week. I still have nightmares about those old roads with about an inch of pure ice on them, Boston Mountain was a real thriller. We drove over there a few weeks ago to eat at AQ Chicken House, couldn't believe the difference in the roads, they took all the sport out of driving over there, Guess Dan P Holmes got his wishes. RM~
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wrote:

What is "Texas" root rot?
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Check out this site. It gives a good explanation.
http://www.forestpests.org/ash/txsrtrot.html
JPS
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That's where we stand right now, they just cut down the oak and she has a huge amount of Hosta under it. I suspect we will have to transplant it someplace else until we can get the stump ground out and something else (probably the CP) planted. I may have to get one of those canvas canopy's to use during the real hot part of the summer. Tulsa's climate is quite similar to that of Dallas's. Thanks, RM ~
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wrote:

You can buy shade cloth at Lowes or the Depot and make something to shade them. Or, if you wait all those tent canopy things will all be on clearance.
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Rob Mills wrote:

What is AEP?
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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On Sun, 03 Jul 2005 22:44:00 GMT, "Travis"

American Electric Power.
Ian
--
Was it not a comedy, a strange and stupid
matter, this repetition, this running around
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Oh, geeze. I just checked with hubby, it was a blonde moment. It was the CHINA trees that were pests, not the Chinese Pistach.
Sorry sorry sorry..... I apologize. (really am blonde too!)
Kate
: >: I'm thinking about putting a Chinese Pistachio tree in my back yard but : >: haven't found any information on it's root system. I would like to know : >how : >: it is with surface roots. Just got rid of some Sweet Gums and don't care : >to : >: do that again. RM~ : >: : >: : > :
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No problem. Chinaberry is a very noxious weed, so your heart was in the right place. That's why I asked you.
Victoria - strawberry blonde, natural.
On Sun, 03 Jul 2005 22:47:24 GMT, "SVTKate"

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: No problem. Chinaberry is a very noxious weed, so your heart was in : the right place. That's why I asked you. : : Victoria - strawberry blonde, natural. :
Huh.. me too.. same thing. Only now getting some greys sneeking in there.
Beats highlights I suppose LOL
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