Cherry trees losing leaves?

I have 3 good sized black cherry trees in my backyard. I just noticed that they have lost most of their leaves. It has been unusually cold and wet this year and the yard is a bit swampy (Rochester NY), maybe that is responsible? Or maybe they do it every August and I have just never noticed. (I have lots and lots of trees back there, so not noticing these would be easy enough)
Is this something to be concerned about? If so, is there anything to be done? Thanks.
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The leaves on my neighbor's cherry tree turned yellow and fell off, the first time I remember that happening. Also, my willow is losing a lot of leaves (turning yellow w/black spots). These are large trees.
My guess it's the rain and humidity. With trees that size I suppose there's nothing that can be done. Hopefully new leaves next year will be OK.
Sue(tm) Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
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This happened to me last year and I thought I'd lost the trees, but they came back healthy this year, and even had a few cherries for the first time! BUT it is happening again this year, at least to one of the trees and it is a real worry. I wonder if a tree can survive that kind of stress two years in a row? It has been outrageously rainy here in Baltimore this year and last, but the trees are on the uphill part of the lot, so I'm not sure that explains it.

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It happens to my Starkrimson cherry here in Bawlmer.
Alan
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I think that most trees in cool regions get the majority of their good photo-synthesizing done in the first few months of leaf growth. Leaves are constantly being attacked by insects and pathogens, and I'm sure that the methods that the tree uses to retain them (harden them, add more harsh chemicals to them, etc) interfere with the straightforward process of turning sunlight into food. I imagine that most northern trees can survive just fine if they get 3 or 4 good months of good photo-synthesis in with nice juicy green absorbent leaves, and if they are just dropping their leaves now, in early August, that means they had April, May, June, and July to make food. I think trouble is more guaranteed when you get several adverse events several years in a row. (Drought one year, insect infestation another, very late frost one year, very early frost another, too much rain another). I think the East has gone from one or two years or rather severe droughts to a summer with too much rain in many places. The trees might be reacting to yet another stress. I wouldn't write them off until you've had one or two "normal" years, to see how they do when conditions are actually favorable for a switch.
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