cereus

Steve,
We visited Mesa Verde Nat'l Park and many patches of Opuntia. There appeared to be several species. There were large differences in size of "pads" and spines, or so it seemed. I've googled this one but can't find any answers. I don't have any flower picutres since they were all finished blooming. Ideas?
Thanks,
Tomski
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Boissevain & Davidson reported the same thing back in 1940. Apparently there is a hybrid swarm involving Opuntia fragilis and other species from the Opuntia polyacantha complex in the area. Makes one wonder what the native residents were doing with the native cacti way back then. Too bad you missed the flowers. Flower are in a wide range of colors from yellow to reddish purple.

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On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 22:00:08 GMT, Bourne Identity
no

W is a pilot...

there is no hell

he didn't have orgasms

it is late on Tuesday
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Tom Jaszewski wrote:

I was at Mesa Verde a few weeks ago. The thing that struck me was that the burned areas are growing back with canadian thistles instead of little pinyon pines and juniper trees. There was thistle fluff blowing around in the air like cottonwood fluff.
All the other national parks with burned areas were growing back in with little trees.
Best regards, Bob
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