Carnivorous plants

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Yes that is what I meant. Sorry for the confusion. I have lotsa plants (over 100 in my 1 bedroom condo) they make great "pets" and a very soothing atmosphere. I wanted to get something a little more excotic like a venus fly trap. However it must be non-toxic to the orther domestic pets. The cat nor Dog has ever eaten any of my plants but I do want to make certain that it could not hurt them if eaten. Of course I did not mean that the plants could eat the animals I could see how that was taken. Pretty funny image if you think about it. Thank you all. George
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On 21 Nov 2003 17:02:04 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@Yahoo.com (George B) wrote: Of course I did not mean that

George, and Fellow Students, all of my animals have caused some attrition to some of my plants. Cats enjoy shredding things. dogs like to either go in search of imaginary rabbits, trampling everything in their path...or else, they really DO enjoy eating some plants. Currently i grow no plants on the official toxic ornamental plant list, but there is such a list, and it has Lily Of The Valley on it, and other seemingly harmless and common plants. Since there are terrarium subjects, right? you could make some sort of cover which would be animal proof. i have terrariums without plants, with lizards living in them, and so far, (15 years or so) no dog or cat has gotten in there. YOU CAN DO IT!
hermine
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Some people DO have pet crickets doncha know.
-paggers

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But how do you walk them? Or hop them? :-) LeeAnne

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snipped-for-privacy@Yahoo.com (George B) wrote:

http://www.humane-so-arizona.org/Poisonous%20plants.pdf
According to this, all parts of a venus flytrap are toxic if ingested.
I'd suggest nixing the idea of venus flytraps if you have animals.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in (George B) wrote:

You'll probably have problem with pets and plants if you feed the plants meat. Eventually Snoppy or Garfield will smell it, get curious and probably redecorate your aquarium.
It wouldn't surprise me if a lot of carnivorous plants are poisonous, given they would probably need protection from starving herbivores that wandered into a bog with not much else edible around.
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I have a carniverous plant query so might as well insert it into this existing thread. My White Topped Pitcher Plant got trampled to the ground by a racoon a year ago & never fully recovered; it tried but did not succeed in producing even one full trumpet this rest of the year. It's still alive; it produced long tall unfinished trumpets, but they never got to the point where it could "eat." The "rootball" is minimal & merely anchors it, I don't believe it gets ANY nourishment from the soil. So, is there any chance this plant may still bounce back next year? Without having caught even one moth or bug, it seems it'll have to be even weaker next year than it was this past year so is just doomed. It was so pretty before the racoon got it. Will I have to give up & get another one altogether??
-paghat
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My recommendation would be to foliar feed this plant, even through winter if any part of it stays evergreen in your region. It should bounce back, but I find this particular family of plants appreciates colonization, rather than specimen settings. I think with regular foliar applications of seaweed it will recover. See if you can find other plants to form a colony in the same family and plant them nearby.
On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 15:51:58 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@netscapeSPAM-ME-NOT.net (paghat) opined:

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snipped-for-privacy@sdfklio7sd.com wrote:

Thanks, will try foliered seaweed, never heard of doing that. It does live in a colony of sorts, but it's the only white trumpet sarracenia, the rest of the grouping consists of very strong Purple Pitcher Plants which are much shorter (almost prostrate) sarracenias, plus a single not-as-strong hybrid called ladies-in-waiting which in two years has remained rather dwarfed. They used to share the bog with a cobra plant but it sent out runners & spread willynilly so I had to separate those into their own little bog (the cobra was also racoon-trounced but bounced back with extreme speed).

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On Fri, 28 Nov 2003 00:32:05 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@netscapeSPAM-ME-NOT.net (paghat) opined:

There is not a plant I know of which cannot or does not benefit from foliar fertilization. Seaweed has so many incredible properties, one of which is a great range of trace elements, and can give a range of protection to plants which are living on the cusp of a zone change. For example, here where I am, it can be 8b-9a some years, 8a-8b some others. Doesn't sound like a wide range, but it is. Seaweed can protect plants and help them through light frosts of 32 degrees better than if no seaweed had been administered throughout the seasons.
Try it. I'd be interested to know if or when you see new growth emerge.
Victoria
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