can i get help here...new

hello all, i have joined this forum to be my help for this year of gardening!! i have a long garden which needs some attention
the main problem i have at the moment is ''poo'' from cat/fox on my grass and in the bed, can i have some help on how to stop this as i have a 16 months old little girl and wud like her to play outside. (obviously have picked the bits up but need a long term solution :) )
2) ... best way to grass a patch of mud, very shaded damp area 3) (on budget) plants for hanging baskets and bed, cheap but resiliant to shade and damp
many many thanks x
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sammy-2-garden

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Something to consider.
Bill who placed the **** below.
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1: Pediatr Pulmonol. 2008 Feb;43(2):107-16. Links
Childhood asthma epidemiology: insights from comparative studies of rural and urban populations. Wong GW, Chow CM. Department of Pediatrics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, China. snipped-for-privacy@cuhk.edu.hk Asthma is one of the most common chronic respiratory disorders. Many epidemiology studies have suggested an increasing trend of asthma in many different regions of the world but the exact reasons explaining such trend remain unclear. Nevertheless, changing environmental factors are most likely important in explaining the trend of asthma. Studies in the past decade have clearly shown a mark difference in the prevalence between urban and rural regions. The consistent findings of a markedly lower prevalence of asthma in children and adults who have been brought up in a farming environment clearly indicate the importance of environmental influence of asthma development. Although the exact protective environmental factors in the rural region remain to be defined,
****there have been many studies suggesting that early exposure to microbes or microbial products may play a role in modulating the immune system so as to reduce the future risk of asthma and allergies.****
Advances in the understanding of the genetic predisposition and how these genetic factors may interact with specific environment factors are of paramount importance for the future development of primary preventive strategies for asthma. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID: 18092349 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2006 Apr;96(4):571-8. Links
Effect of animal contact and microbial exposures on the prevalence of atopy and asthma in urban vs rural children in India. Vedanthan PK, Mahesh PA, Vedanthan R, Holla AD, Liu AH. University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, USA. snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Environmental factors, including microbial exposures and close animal contact, are implicated in the lower prevalence of asthma and allergy in rural vs urban children. OBJECTIVES: To determine (1) the prevalence of asthma, rhinitis, eczema, and atopic sensitization in rural and urban children in India; (2) differences in microbial and animal exposures in these locales; and (3) whether differences in environmental exposures account for the different rates of asthma and atopy in these locales. METHODS: One child from each of 50 urban (Mysore) and 50 rural (Vinobha) households in southern India was randomly selected for data analysis. Allergy, asthma, health, environment, and lifestyle information was obtained using a questionnaire and household inspections. Atopy was determined via skin prick testing for common allergens. Endotoxin content was measured in house dust samples. RESULTS: Children from rural vs urban areas had lower prevalences of self-reported asthma (8% vs 30%; P = .005), rhinitis (22% vs 42%; P = .03), and atopic sensitization (36% vs 58%; P = .03). Higher median dust endotoxin loads were found in rural vs urban households (6.50 x 10(4) EU/m2 vs 1.27 x 10(4) EU/m2; P < .001). In multivariate analysis, close indoor animal contact (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.2; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.9), outdoor animal contact (OR, 0.3; 90% CI, 0.1-0.8), and exclusive breastfeeding for at least 6 months (OR, 0.2; 90% CI, 0.1-0.5) were associated with lower atopic sensitization; mud flooring was associated with lower self-reported wheezing (OR, 0.1; 90% CI, 0.02-1.0).
****CONCLUSION: Children in India who live with close animal contact and mud flooring and who were exclusively breastfed in infancy are less likely to develop asthma, rhinitis, and atopic sensitization.****
PMID: 16680928 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Perhaps a piece of sod from another area of your garden.
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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