Can Growing Tomatoes From Seed At Home Help Prevent Late Blight?

I think it can help indeed. Last season Penn State university was warning about another bad year for late blight in our area. I started all my plants indoors from seed. Gave plants to many of my neighbors and not one of these plants were hit with late blight or any other disease! I think when you buy your plants from a nursery or chain store, you take the chance that your plants may be diseased when you take them home. These growers raise their plants on a much larger scale and in my opinion, it increases the risk of disease spreading throughout their plants. What do you think?
Rich
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"EVP MAN" wrote

I've experienced exactly that from the commercial growers seedlings. Last year was not a good one to get healthy plants.
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On Dec 30, 11:23 am, White snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (EVP MAN) wrote:

I have always started them from seed and have yet to produce a good tomato crop. Does anyone know if acidic water would cause blight or wilt? I water with lake water that is acidic, not exactly what the ph is. MJ
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