Camellias from seed?

In weeding the garden, I pulled what I later realized was a small C. sasanqua that had sprouted from a seed dropped by a nearby specimen. I wonder about raising such sprouts to maturity.
Has anyone here successfully raised volunteer camellias? How did they turn out?
Mike Prager Beaufort, NC (on the coast in zone 8a) (Remove spam traps from email address to reply.)
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My experience was rather like trying to win the lottery : one died young, one was very weak and spindly, and one grew well, but it never did flower., didn't even make buds. A friend had better luck and got a pretty good plant, so why not go ahead and try it. Maybe you will get a winning number!
If it doesn't work, you can always "forget" to water it...................
Emilie NorCal
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MLEBLANCA wrote:

Thanks for the info. I think I will try it next time.
As you say, nothing is permanent....
M
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Rooting around for information, I discovreed that Camellias rarely breed true from seed and that cuttings are the more common way to propagate.
I have several sturdy plants around the base of my overgrown Camellia bush/tree hat have grown from (dropped) seed, but I usually dig them up and give them away before I've seen them flower.
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