Break New Ground....Build More Beds.....Get More Pots Growing

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Yikes. Treated, as in pressure treated? As in, poison leaching into the food you are eating? RR ties wil be the same. Check out www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/PM1033.pdf
Rocks or brick, OK. Lumber, OK. Maybe check out plasticized wood that is used for decks. Hay bales, OK. Mounded dirt, OK. Old porcelain bath tubs, OK but not pressure treated wood or RR ties, or old telephone poles.
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Billy
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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General rule of thumb for me is if it won't rot not good.
Creosote a human carcinogen was a staple for RR ties, Piers and telephone poles. Sure it will keep ant's out of your house but. They used to make up a mix of Mercury and Lead to prevent rot which was fazed out about 1960. Used on sailing vessel mostly but when recycling wood , old wood remember it might be here due to poison. Lead paint works great but forty years later can cause brain damage. Leaded gas fazed out about 1968 but all those greens along the highway may be toxic.
Be careful out here:))
Bill
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S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
http://www.ocutech.com/ High tech Vison aid
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<Charlie> wrote in message> I's lookin'...........not too good.

One reason I put in a vege garden & polytunnel 18 odd months ago and have started to learn things far more intensively than when I had my last vege garden. Learn it now & it'll be there if/when I need it. I am dabbling with seed saving & green manuring as well should things go south.
The sudden spike in dairy prices has been good news for our dairy farmers. I saw a figure today suggesting $ NZ 2 billion extra this season. The reserve bank (who are fixated with inflation) is warning farmers to keep the money in their pockets least it fuels inflation. We are shortly getting bio-fuel plants here converting tallow, whey & waste cooking oil into bio-diesel & ethanol. We will get about 4% of our diesel needs & about 1% of our petrol substitutes this way. There is some technology to extract bio-diesel from algae grown on sewerage ponds. That would be useful for both municipal & farm based effluent. That'd give a reasonable % substitute for fossil diesel when it dissappears. Maybe at a guess 10-15%. That is a quite a generous figure a bio-fuel substitute for a fossil fuel.
Peak oil will come sometimes. We may have just had it, we may be in the centre of it now, it may be just around the corner or it may be 20 odd years away. Some will scoff & say we will never run out of oil as morw will be discovered as prices make it economically feasible to extract. ROFTL. and ROFTL again. Thats part of the point of peak oil. It is not only the possibility of oil running out, it is also the pricing out. Oil may be available however the price of it is likely to make intensive use infeasible, in my opinion. Using shit loads of oil through fuel & fertilisers, as described in this thread, are likely to go by the way.
If people want a handle on how things may go, I say may as the future is open, have a look at Cuba. They went through a peak oil exercise with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the loss of their primary export & import market and primary source of oil. Their economy contracted by about 30-40% I believe. The average Cuban lost a number of kilograms. The country adapted to the changes & severe pain by growing a large % of their food in allotments, went organic (because they had no access to pestidices & fertilisers) & focussed more on growing the islands food needs rather than import it. To that end they were mainly successful. Transport wise they went back to pedal & animal power in many cases. A legacy in Habana was the public transport system. They came out with things called Camellos (spanish for Camel). Massive articulated lorries pulling tractors that had been converted to seating. 200-300 people could fit in to a Camello. The Camellos are still running although due to be phased out with the arrival of buses from China. http://havanajournal.com/gallery/image_full/61 / http://havanajournal.com/gallery/image_full/62 /
I was there in March & found it a really interesting trip. Only did 3 weeks so not enough time to look closely at these types of things. I hope to go back for another look at some point.
rob
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