Borage

I'm growing 2 borage plants this year and they're starting to flower which looks nice. I'd like that they keep growing all summer though. Should I clip these flowers like you're supposed to clip basil flowers to encourage the plant to grow more? I have an image of it up at:
http://www.brandylion.com/images/borage.jpg
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On Thu, 3 Jun 2004 13:36:23 -0500, Mark Anderson

You can clip off the flowers as you wish. The flowers make an interesting and tasty addition to a salad. One of the benefits of borage is to encourage bees to your garden, so leave some flowers for them.
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On Thu, 3 Jun 2004 13:36:23 -0500, Mark Anderson

Is that your own photo and plant? Both are gorgeous.
I've never heard of pinching back borage. The flowers are edible and very pretty frozen in ice cubes to tart up summer drinks. Or to decorate salads.
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In article snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com says...

Yes, I took that with an older digital camera. Borage has a lot of fur on it that reflects sunlight in an interesting way. This is my first time growing Borage. I look for herbs that grow 3' or more high and this year the place I go to had this and I had no idea what it was. I'm also growing Lovage for the first time since that is supposed to grow high too.

Thanks for the info, I'll try that. I was worried because last year I grew Cilantro and after that flowered it petered out about the third week of June making me trash the entire plant to reuse the pot. In my garden, if the plant doesn't produce (I.e. grow big) it's out of here. :-)
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On Sun, 6 Jun 2004 03:04:17 -0500, Mark Anderson

Cilantro is a short-lived annual. It will never get big and bushy like parsley. In fact, if you've ever seen cilantro with roots in the grocery store, you will notice that the 'bunch' is actually 20 or 30 individual plants. The 'trick', if you want to have a good supply for cooking, is to have many plants and sow more seeds every 2 weeks or so. Cilantro likes sun, but heat makes it bolt quickly. It's too bad you trashed the plant, as you could have used the mature seeds for cooking (it's usually called coriander in the seed form) and starting new plants.
If you're after architecture, however, cilantro/coriander is a bust. :-) Dill is quite nice -- tall and feathery. It also doesn't live very long (longer than cilantro) but the seed heads are quite large and attractive (and useful). Rosemary is a perennial in much of the US and can become a good-sized bush.
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