Black Walnut tree growing normally?

I have previously heard that black walnuts tend to grow rapidly. We planted one last year and it only grew about 2 inches, which is not totally unexpected given that it was probably using a lot of its energy to grow a taproot. It has now been over 3 weeks since the last frost. All of the maples and oaks on my street are getting buds, but the walnut appears to still be dormant (or dead, I really don't know how to tell). Do those take later in the season to start growing, and if so, should I expect it to grow more this year? It is in partial sun because we have 3 maples on the easement that provide some shade during particular times of day. Hopefully that won't have an overly negative effect on it.
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of the maples and oaks on my street are getting buds, but

Buds would have been formed last year and not now.
Do those take later in the season to start growing, and

If I was in your area I would look at the tree for you. I would use a SHIGOMETER to determine the trees vitality.
A good article on rhizosphere is here: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
Pruning here: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/tree_pruning /
Planting here: http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub1.html
More on chemistry and fert. here: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
Maybe more information then you want?
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
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I... ummm.... I know how to spell the word "tree." Does that count for anything? You'll have to forgive me. I majored in econ in college and am in law school right now. The rhizosphere article and the chemistry article were both a little over my head. I also could not afford such a device as a shigometer. Is there some cheap alternative to using such an expensive device to test my soil? I live in Michigan, and don't think you want to drive all the way from PA. Thanks for all the info though
On Sun, 1 Apr 2007 15:13:23 -0400, "symplastless"

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Maybe you could locate a good arborist in your area that has a SHIGOMETER.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
wrote:

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Ah, yeah, instead of the shigometer, try this: Starting with the tip of a branch, bend it slowly between your hands. If it's pliable, there's hope. If it snaps like a twig, it's dead. And yes, it should have at least some buds by now. Doesn't sound especially hopeful, sorry to say.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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I also took soil samples from about Black walnut trees in old growth forest. This could be a guide as to what elements may be lacking. I would be willing to share the data.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.

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For example.
I tested two areas of old growth with very mature black walnut trees. Two soil sample were sent to Cornell for testing. First the pH was 6.99 and 6.86. I would think this would be a good target for soil pH in the upper four inches of soil. This place was untampered with and the walnut trees were huge. I have results for the two test for some of the essential elements. It might be more data than you wanted. Example. These are available essential elements at pounds per acre. The essential element iron was 0.7 and 0.5 The essential element phosphorus was 0 and 12.1 The essential element potassium was 581 and 316 The essential element magnesium was 573.5 and 343.3 The essential element calcium was 7417 and 4817 The essential element aluminum was 934.8 and 603.4 The essential element manganese was 54 and 55.7 The essential element zinc was 2.13 and 2.17 The essential element copper was 10.9 and 6.3 The essential element nitrogen in the form of nitrate (NO3-N) was 82.22 and 31.11
I also have a list of acid soluble essential elements. These numbers would represent optimum fertility levels taken from old growth forest. What the trees had without impact of humans. The results varied greatly from different sites with different species. We need to stop fertilizing our trees as if they were corn. Fertilizers are salts of essential elements.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
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Sorry
The soil samples for black walnut were in old growth in Indiana.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Apr 1, 10:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yes, Black Walnuts are very late leafers. And English Walnuts are even later. Just about all trees, including oaks and maples are fully leafed out here in Northern Calif. and the Black Walnuts are just showing leaves. Some in colder pockets are just showing buds. English Walnuts are just barely showing flower buds. So be patient and don't give up on your tree yet. Emilie
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