bineweed

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Can anyone suggest how I can stop bineweed creeping under the fence that divides my garden from the adjoining playing fields. I spend hours each year digging it up. is there a better solution?
-Lyn
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Yes. All sorts of weird chemicals, but you probably won't want to put your hands in the soil after using them.
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wrote:

Dilligent and relentless cutting it off at the base at least once a week. If the plant doesn't produce foliage it will eventually run out of life. This procedure must be done at least once a week, if not every four days. If it goes to flower and sets seeds, which it does at a remarkable rate, you're toast. Also, it's called bindweed, not bineweed, if it's the plant I'm thinking of.
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This is an example of the world catering to bad spellers. I found references to both names, sharing the same Latin designation - the convulvulus whatever it is relative of morning glory. I guess scientists have surrendered to mass culture. :-(
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Local folklore suggests that bindweed exists as a remedy for poison ivy which may exist in proximity. Does here. I prefer soap and water for possible contact with ivy. The bindweed was to be used as a lotion after the fact.
What the hell is convulvulus o learned one?
I guess you meant Convolvulus.
Bill
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Right. I misspelled it. You win. Go have a fruit rollup to celebrate.
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2007 17:52:58 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Bindweed because it literally binds anything in its path. Oh, and, uh...convulvulous? Hahahaha, you're a riot. :)
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Yeah. I already got burned for that.
Here's something that stinks of heresy: When lawns start choking from heat and drought in the middle of summer, bindweed stays green and feels cool to the feet. In other words, in my previous home, I surrendered. A guy from the NY Department of Environmental Conservation said "Yeah, there's a chemical you can use to get rid of it, but it's sorta like agent orange. Got kids? Want them to live more than a week?"
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When you pull bindweed out, each root fragment grows into a new plant. The only way is to kill the plants and roots. I have used two methods, smothering under a barrier and Roundup. Roundup kills the plants roots and all. Smothering is slow but eventually again.
<http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/plantsci/weeds/w802w.htm
Regarding the plant that is used as a treatment for poison ivy, it is jewelweed.
PRO: <http://www.hbci.com/~wenonah/hydro/jewelwed.htm
CON: <http://www.wemjournal.org/wmsonline/?request=get-abstract&issn 53-9859 &volume2&issue&page78>
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Thanks for the correction!
Bill
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2007 21:52:54 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

I am not suggesting anyone use "sorta like agent orange!" But there are those out there who still hanker for Kelthane. Go figure.
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Kelthane is a miticide, not a herbicide. Bindweed does attract spider mites so Kelthane would make it healtheir.
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wrote:

With all due respect, I was not talking to you. Kelthane has been banned from the market. It's one of the most toxic chemicals on earth and pesticides are all pesticides, even if they are herbicides, still covered under the pesticide umbrella. Kelthane could never make any plant healthier. It's soil and cultural practices which gives plants health.
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If you are not talking to members of the rec.gardens community, then don't post to it. It is not your email.
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wrote:

When quoting someone it is nice to include the whole post.
With all due respect, I was not talking to you. Kelthane has been banned from the market. It's one of the most toxic chemicals on earth and pesticides are all pesticides, even if they are herbicides, still covered under the pesticide umbrella. Kelthane could never make any plant healthier. It's soil and cultural practices which gives plants health.
I was still not talking to you, with all due respect.
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If herbicides are pesticides (by strict definition), then athlete's foot medications also fall under the heading of seafood.
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On Wed, 21 Mar 2007 11:44:24 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Maybe too early, but what did that mean?
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Cows and elephants share certain characteristics, but a cow is not an elephant. Herbicides and pesticides also share certain characteristics, but they are NOT synonymous, as you are suggesting.
A significant portion of American population is functionally illiterate. Spreading misinformation is irresponsible, and perhaps even treasonous.
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On Wed, 21 Mar 2007 12:45:36 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

I was a professional grower for one of the largest operations in the east coast with over a million sq. ft. under glass. Pesticides include insecticides, herbicides and miticides. This is accurate information so I think best you do some research before telling me I am spreading misinformation. Now go do your treasonous posting.
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Now we know why you said "was".
A pesticide is "a substance used for destroying insects or other organisms harmful to cultivated plants or to animals. But, by definition it doesn't harm the plant or animal."
A herbicide is "a substance that is toxic to plants and is used to destroy unwanted vegetation."
So not only are they not the same, they can't be the same by definition.
By the way, what does "I am not talking to you" mean. You by definition "is used to refer to the person or people that the speaker is addressing." So to say "I am not talking to you" is absolutely meaningless.
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