Betula Utilis Jaquemontii(Himalayan Birch)

Hello,
I have just moved into a property which has a birch as described above in the rear yard of the property.It is approximately 15 feet high and I am wondering how I would tackle moving it onto a grassland area of the location.
Currently it is in a courtyard which has been tarmaced except for a 1 square metre square in which the tree is growing out from.
The main concern for me is the root system and what would be the best method in tackling digging it out without risking damage to the root system. I presume a fairly substantial removal of the surrounding tarmac area would be in order but I wanted to be sure of this. Any help or assistance from you would be greatly appreciated, if only to point me in the direction of an organisation or body that could give me advise or even assist in the job itself.
I live in Plymouth, Devon.
Thank you.
--
Terry Deans


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Established birches really dislike being moved. You would face a lot of ground disruption (and expense, if you paid a specialist) with little hope of the tree's survival. The cheapest, easiest way would be to buy a new container grown tree, ( B jacquemontii is easily available in any GC) to plant where you want. It will be smaller but will grow fast.
Cut down the other one leaving a stump about 3 ft high. Excavate around the roots, sever them under ground (axe/saw) using the stump as a lever to rock and loosen the roots, until you can pick it up. (This removal is much easier to do, than it sounds). Fill in the hole. Any remaining roots will just decompose, no chance of them coming back to life.
Janet
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Janet Baraclough;877247 Wrote: > The message snipped-for-privacy@gardenbanter.co.uk

> I

> tarmac

> in

> lot

> tree,

Thank you Janet,
This has been very helpful and i appreciate your reply and advice.
I will get another tree now and I'm only sorry to see the demise of a perfectly healthy one! Sounds like the root system isnt too widespread so the digging and root excavation by hand seems the way ahead.
Thanks again and good luck.
Terry
--
Terry Deans


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On Fri, 12 Feb 2010 07:35:58 -0500, Terry Deans

It's difficult to say without a photo. At 15' tall it's likely a fairly young and small tree, probably hasn't a diameter more than 4"-5". Contact a nursery to ask about having it machine dug with a "tree spade": http://www.dutchmantreespade.com/index.html
With a sq meter of space they shouldn't need to touch your paved area.... only real concern is access and if the pavement can support the digging machine. But this won't come cheap... why move it, if it's healthy leave it there... would cost much less to plant a new tree in the open area. If you attempt to dig up a tree that size yourself by hand with a shovel odds are it will die.
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brooklyn1;877250 Wrote: > On Fri, 12 Feb 2010 07:35:58 -0500, Terry Deans

> tarmac

> in

Hello there,
Thank you very much for the great advice and guidance.
It does grieve me to move this tree if it means it's demise. I think the original planters of it where a bit thoughtless of it's location and the fact that it is actually part of a car parking space within a courtyard area. But, of course, I shouldnt blame them, perhaps they had their own ideas as to the use of the space at their own property! It's just such a shame. I will be planting a new sapling at the location I have suggested now, seeing as there seems little chance of successfully replanting this without going to massive expense.
Thanks again.
Terry
--
Terry Deans


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On Tue, 16 Feb 2010 07:15:26 -0500, Terry Deans

As I said earlier, I would just leave it there,,, those type of birch trees don't grow very fast or very large, and they respond well to drastic pruning, in fact they improve with regular pruning. Probably likely the folks who chose to plant that particular tree there knew a lot about what they were doing. And it's not very difficult to open up the asphalt pavement opening... I certainly would so that the tree's roots don't struggle for nutrients... it's very easy to enhance the opening with a circular bench, of wood or cast iron, or if you need the space at the pavemnt grade attractive natural patio stones can be fit in.... some folks even have an ornate wrought iron grate custom made. I wouldn't be too quick to chop down that tree... odds are won't be long afterwards you will rue the day.
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